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  • Self-described introvert Heidi Kasevich ’87 founded the Quiet Education program to empower quieter voices in classrooms often dominated by those who are most inclined to speak.

  • After his 8-year-old son Owen drowned on a family rafting trip, Stéphane Gerson ’88 was seized by a compulsion to write. His new memoir tells the story of his family’s journey through grief.

  • Japanese Emperor Akihito is currently considering abdication. Back in 1953, the then-Japanese Crown Prince only 19 when he stopped by Haverford’s campus.

  • Geology major Henry Richardson ’83, now a self-taught artist and sculptor, manipulates enormous sheets of plate glass into ethereal sculptures in his purpose-built barn studio in the Berkshires. 

  • Dan Greenspan '77 discusses how he has bridged his passions as a jazz bassist and bread baker.

  • Former Haverford soccer player Adam Cann ’06 is a tactical wiz, and now writes about the game he loves for the Philly Soccer Page.

  • Bryon Powell ’00 followed his passion for ultramarathons to a new career editing his own distance-running website.

  • The expansion of Haverford’s Initiative in Ethical Engagement and Leadership brings opportunities for students to grapple with ethical questions in a variety of ways.

  • In a year in which the powerful historical symbol of resistance inspired a wave of new art (including the Pulitzer Prize winner for fiction), Scott Sheppard ’06 co-created and starred in The Underground Railroad Game, a lauded theater production mounted both in Philadephia and New York. 

  • Dana Nichols ’14 has been training with the West Philly-based company since she graduated, and is now making a profession out of her passion for dance.

     

  • What began as a business opportunity for Adam M. Pener ’95 has become a mission: to shift the shipping industry from wood pallets to those made from environmentally friendly corrugated cardboard.

  • Fake News has become a social media scourge, and perhaps a threat to all of us. Four alumni journalists muse on what’s driving the phenomenon and how it might be stopped.

  • Considered pioneering when it was created, one history class was unparalleled in exposing majors to hands-on work in historical research. Nowadays, this work has been incorporated in students’ senior theses.

  • Since his start as a fresh-out-of-college CBS News researcher, Ken Goldstein ’87 has worked on network election-night coverage of every U.S. presidential election since 1988. Today, the professor of politics and political advertising expert can be found crunching numbers and picking winners behind the scenes for ABC News.

  • Back in the 1990s, neuroscientist Andrew Newberg began scanning the brains of people deep in meditation. Since then, he’s done hundreds of brain scans of people engaged in spiritual and religious practices, along the way becoming a pioneer in a new field called neurotheology, which is revealing the connections between these practices and emotional and physical health.

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