Teaching Resources & Support

Haverford provides a number of programs and funds to support teaching at the college, including:

Pedagogical Resources & Guidelines

  • Reflecting & Refining Pedagogical Skills Resources

    The Andrew W. Mellon Teaching and Learning Institute

    Supported by a grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to Bryn Mawr College and coordinated by Professor of Education Alison Cook-Sather, the Teaching and Learning Institute supports Bryn Mawr and Haverford College faculty members and undergraduate students in partnerships through which they explore, affirm, and revise classroom practice. 

    Full-time, continuing faculty members may choose to participate in cross-disciplinary, semester-long or half-semester, Faculty Pedagogy Seminars and work in one-on-one partnerships with undergraduate students who assume the role of pedagogical consultant.

    Part-time and interim faculty members are not eligible for participation in the seminars but may partner with student consultants through the Students as Learners and Teachers (SaLT) program.

    In addition to these partnerships, continuing faculty members can participate in faculty seminars known as TLI2s (for those who have already participated in a faculty pedagogy seminar), Colleagues as Teachers and Learners (cross-visitations between faculty members, or “teaching circles”) and Summer Course Development/Revision Workshops.


    Full- or Half-semester Faculty Pedagogy Seminars

    If you are a full-time, continuing faculty member at Haverford, you are eligible to participate in a faculty pedagogy seminar. If you choose to participate in a full- or half-semester faculty pedagogy seminar, you are committing to:

    • attending and participating in weekly, semi-structured, two-hour discussions focused on what is happening in their classrooms and what could happen there
    • posting weekly entries to a closed blog in response to general prompts (e.g., In what ways are your approaches to assessment aligned and/or misaligned with your pedagogy and the learning goals you have for your students?)
    • working with a Student Consultant (a student not enrolled in the faculty member’s courses who visits one class session each week, takes detailed observation notes focused on pedagogical issues the faculty member identifies, and then meets with the faculty member weekly to discuss what is happening in his/her class)
    • facilitating a portion of one or more of the sessions
    • taking observation notes (like those taken by Student Consultants) at one of the sessions
    • offering mid-semester and end-of-semester feedback both to inform the seminar and to document their work, and
    • completing a portfolio at the of the seminar that documents what they have learned.
    Full-Semester Faculty Pedagogy Seminar (carries $4,000 stipend)

    These are semester-long seminars offered in the Fall and/or Spring semesters (depending on faculty interest) and include all of the commitments listed above. They are appropriate for faculty members who want to work with faculty colleagues and student consultants for a full 15 weeks, exploring both a course they are currently teaching and a course (or courses) they plan to teach. The first part of the semester focuses on larger pedagogical questions in relation to a course being taught, the middle portion focuses on issues and topics identified for further exploration by the group, and the final third focuses on applying what we have explored in the seminar to future courses.

    Half-Semester Faculty Pedagogy Seminar (carries $2,000 stipend)

    Half-semester seminars allow for more faculty participation and a differentiation between focusing on a course currently being taught and a course to be taught the next or in a subsequent semester. These seminars are offered in the Fall and/or Spring semesters (depending on faculty interest) and include all of the commitments listed above. Seminars focused on a course currently being taught begin in week 1 and conclude in week 7. Seminars focused on a course to be taught in a future semester begin in week 8 and conclude in week 14.


    Students as Learners and Teachers (SaLT) Partnership

    Student Consultants are available to work with interested faculty members on a focal course. A student who is not enrolled in the course upon which you want to focus can work with you for the entire semester or for some portion of it. S/he visits your class, takes detailed observation notes focused on pedagogical issues you identify, gathers midcourse feedback (if you wish), and meets with you to discuss what is happening in your class.

    These partnerships are for faculty members who do not wish to participate in a faculty pedagogy seminar or have already participated in a seminar and wish to continue in a partnership with a Student Consultant.

    Any faculty member may request a Student Consultant for a full semester, a portion of a semester, or for a focused assessment (e.g., midsemester feedback).


    TLI2

    (carries $3,000 stipend for facilitator, or the stipend can be distributed among participants)

    These seminars are for faculty members who have already participated in a half- or full-semester faculty pedagogy seminar. Suggested by past participants, TLI2s give faculty the opportunity to work in a focused way on a pedagogical issue, interest, or challenge. Participants commit to:

    • meeting bi-weekly for 90 minutes
    • maintaining communication between meetings using Moodle, Google, or some other technology
    • offering mid-semester and end-of-semester feedback both to inform the seminar and to document our work, and
    • documenting the work accomplished in each meeting and overall.
    • Faculty may request Student Consultants to work as partners in TLI2s.

    Colleagues as Teachers and Learners

    This program affords you the opportunity to visit and/or be visited by a faculty colleague in the bi-co and then meet to talk. If you indicate what discipline or division and what kind of class you are interested in observing, appropriate partnerships between faculty who wish to engage in this cross-visitation can be arranged.

    You may wish to combine this program with the SaLT program. Faculty have found that the intersection of faculty and student colleague observations, and a three-way dialogue about what is happening in the classroom, are very informative.


    Summer Course Development/Revision Workshops

    Continuing and new faculty members are invited to participate in summer workshops focused on developing a new course or revising an existing one.

    Working in collaboration with other faculty members, members of the Information Services staff, and undergraduate students in the role of pedagogical consultant, you may develop a syllabus from scratch, revise a syllabus in a general way, or revise a syllabus with a particular focus (e.g., the integration of technology).

    Participants meet four or five times over the summer, with communication maintained through technological media in between meetings. In-person meetings are scheduled around participants’ schedules. While no stipends are attached to this forum, travel beyond the regular commute to campus may be reimbursed.

    More information?  Contact Alison Cook-Sather acooksat@haverford.edu or acooksat@brynmawr.edu

  • Off-campus Training Funds

    John B. Hurford '60 Center for Arts and Humanities

    The Hurford Center for Arts and Humanities offers Access/Enrichment Grants.  Recognizing that the stimulus for innovative research and teaching, as well as for the organization of public events, often emerges from ideas and experiences encountered outside the faculty's usual scholarly societies and conferences, the Humanities Center supports several Access/Enrichment Grants each year.

     Access


    Center for Peace and Global Citizenship

    The Center for Peace and Global Citizenship, through its Faculty/Curricular Support Fund, sponsors faculty-initiated events designed to spur thoughtful dialogue on issues of global significance. The format may vary, running the gamut from a panel discussion to technical training to a lecture/performance. Regardless of the format, the goal is to provide members of the Haverford community with access to recognized expertise on important issues in a way that stimulates intellectual reflection. Monthly application deadlines.

     Off Campus Conferences and Workshops Fund


    Koshland Integrated Science Center

    Funds are available from the KINSC to support faculty travel to professional meetings and training workshops in order to enhance teaching and faculty-student research at Haverford.

    KINSC travel funds

  • Funds for Events, Exhibitions, Artistic Residencies, Symposia, etc. in support of classes

    Center for Peace and Global Citizenship

    The Center for Peace and Global Citizenship, through its Faculty/Curricular Support Fund, sponsors faculty-initiated events designed to spur thoughtful dialogue on issues of global significance. The format may vary, running the gamut from a panel discussion to technical training to a lecture/performance. Regardless of the format, the goal is to provide members of the Haverford community with access to recognized expertise on important issues in a way that stimulates intellectual reflection. Monthly application deadlines.

    On Campus Events


    John B. Hurford '60 Center for Arts and Humanities

    For faculty interested in arts events/performances, residencies, and exhibits in conjunction with their classes, the Hurford Center for Arts and Humanities has funds for these activities.

    Arts Events/Performances

    Exhibitions

    Mellon Tri-College Creative Residencies

    If you have a Symposium/Forum/Conference that you would like to organize in support of a class, the Hurford Center for Arts and Humanities will provide up to $10,000 to stage a symposium, conference, or other public event that offers students opportunities to engage in advanced concerns and scholarship in the humanities or social sciences.

    Humanities Forums

    The Hurford Center for Arts and Humanities supports Dialogues on Art trips, in which small groups of faculty and students from a wide variety of departments visit exhibitions, performances, or screenings of contemporary art in and around Philadelphia and then discuss their experiences over dinner.

    Dialogues on Art


    Koshland Integrated Natural Sciences Center

    The Koshland Integrated Natural Sciences Center offers funds for symposia covering topics in interdisciplinary areas such as environmental studies, public health, and science and society.

    Symposia

  • Course Evaluations & Samples

    Course Evaluations

    All faculty members at Haverford are expected to develop a means of evaluating their teaching on a regular basis, although the methods used to collect student opinion are normally left to the discretion of the individual. Responses from at least one course per semester should be delivered to the Office of the Provost.

    New and visiting members of the faculty will want to consult with their department chairs and colleagues to see what is customary and recommended practice. If there is no standard form suggested by the department, you might find it helpful to look at the enclosed examples of questionnaires previously and in some cases currently distributed by various faculty members across the College. These examples are not meant to be representative of the best or preferred forms of soliciting student evaluation, but rather of the variety of approaches that faculty have used in the recent past.

    Evaluation Samples

  • Managing Athletic/Academic Concerns

Curricular Development Funding

  • Curricular Development Funds

    Center for Peace and Global Citizenship

    The Center for Peace and Global Citizenship supports Haverford faculty members in their efforts to integrate experiential and service learning into their teaching and mentoring. This might take the form of travel in conjunction with courses, or the development of new courses with experiential learning components. Monthly application deadlines.

    Experiential and service learning


    John B. Hurford '60 Center for Arts and Humanities

    The Hurford Center for Arts and Humanities sponsors the Tuttle Fund for Development of Visual Culture Across the Curriculum . This fund encourages innovative and experimental approaches to visual culture across the curriculum. To advance the integration of visual studies in disciplines ranging beyond Art History and Fine Arts, and to engage students in its various theoretical, generic, and material modes, these grants support development of new courses, the major renovation of existing courses, and/or the creation of interdisciplinary curricular offerings in various areas of visual culture. Proposed work will require resources not normally available through departments or the Provost's Office and will address specific curricular goals.

    Tuttle Fund

    The Hurford Center for Arts and Humanities sponsors Course Innovation/Renovation Grants to help fashion a new course or renovate an existing one to augment its intellectual scope and appeal to students broadly interested in humanistic inquiry.

    Course Innovation/Renovation Grantsn

    The Hurford Center for Arts and Humanities sponsors Course Enhancement Grants of up to $500 is available to support class visits to libraries, collections, or other sites. The grants are for one-time exploratory class trips. The Center does not support ventures beyond the initial grant.

    Course Enhancement Grants

  • Library Assistance for Teaching

    In support of the faculty, librarians teach students research skills and strategies, including the very critical work of finding and interrogating texts, in both print and digital formats. Librarians also facilitate rich, complex, dynamic, and dialectic engagement with these texts. At all academic levels, librarians foster information literacy, understanding, critical reflection, knowledge production, and scholarship with classes, while also providing intensive, one-on-one support with students throughout their college career and culminating in their senior capstone projects.

    Librarians provide a scaffolding of instruction that takes students from the basics of library catalogs and database searching, through an informed use of both print and digital sources, to an insider view of their chosen discipline’s literature. Students at each level are encouraged to develop the evaluative and critical skills that will lead them to more complex projects. Librarians help students learn to contextualize ideas, whether on the screen or in print, and see themselves as active participants in a purposeful conversation.

    Librarians work with faculty to provide instruction tailored to the needs of a particular class in terms of subject matter. They prepare web pages of relevant resources, so that students can become familiar with the key tools they need for research (see a tri-college list of guides for current courses). In their discussions with classes, librarians bring in examples of content and issues that relate to course readings and to individual student research topics. They also explain strategies for navigating library systems, scholarly literatures, and the hybrid world of digital and print resources.

    The Library’s instruction format is very flexible. It can be used in the classroom, in the library, or in a workshop outside of class hours. Students also work individually with librarians on approaches and resources for research questions, with senior thesis writers in contact with their subject librarians throughout the project. Content for instruction can focus on a class research paper, on learning to use particular databases, on resources for a subject area, or whatever will be most useful for students.

    Contact the librarian who works with your department or program (from the subject specialist list) to discuss what kind of instruction your students need.

  • Distinguished Visitors Funding

    Distinguished Visitors Program

    Haverford has an endowed program to assist the faculty in bringing distinguished visitors to the campus in support of their classes. Established by a generous bequest from William Pyle Phillips (Class of 1902) and augmented by gifts from other alumni and Friends of the College, this program supports 60-70 visits to the campus each year by distinguished statesmen and scholars in the arts, sciences and humanities.

    Distinguished Visitors Program Proposal Submission


    Hurford Center for Arts and Humanities

    Faculty bringing visitors with enhanced curricular engagements should also refer to Hurford Center for Arts and Humanities curricular funding initiatives.

    Hurford Center for Arts and Humanities Curricular Development


    Koshland Integrated Natural Science Center

    The Koshland Integrated Natural Sciences Center offers funds for symposia covering topics in interdisciplinary areas such as environmental studies, public health, and science and society.

    Symposia

  • Teaching with Technology Grant

    We continue to offer Teaching with Technology grants to faculty, and wish to draw your attentions to some changes. We will now send a call for applications three times a year, at the end of September, January and May. We hope this will help you plan your technology proposals, and it will also help our office manage the TWT budget.

    TWT is designed for Tenure Track and Continuing Appointment faculty members interested in enhancing their teaching through the use of technology. The grant provides support for using emerging technologies in the classroom, and opportunities for faculty to develop new and innovative approaches to education through technology.

    These grants have been used in a variety projects over the years, including: development of a website interface to specific CD tracks being demonstrating in a Music course, a course site that compiled an extensive view of Medieval art, an interactive web site utilizing current tools to illustrate effective use of a language dictionary, audio annotations critiquing student work, the creation of a Japanese community of past and current students of Japanese including chat, audio, video and graphics, interactive video demonstrations of biological processes, and video demonstrations of the proper technique for using certain equipment necessary in a Physics course. This past year, IITS produced a brief video of Maud McInerney's Teaching with Technology grant project - using an iPad to incorporate images in her class and grade her student work — you can view the video at https://www.youtube.com/watch?fv=nKplV8yylqE

    Funds also can be used to attend conferences or training about the use of technology in teaching or to acquire software for use in a particular course. Grant funds may be used to purchase equipment directly necessary to the success of the underlying project.

    Grant Requirements

    To qualify for a Teaching with Technology grant, the proposal should identify the purpose of the project and what will be needed in order to accomplish the goals of the proposal. Faculty members are encouraged to contact Instructional Technology and Training (hc-techlearn@haverford.edu) for assistance and support in developing the proposals prior to submission of the final application.

    The period of the grant will be one year, or longer, depending on the scope and nature of the proposal. Grant funds will not roll over. Funds not used during the grant period will be made available for other grant recipients the following year.

    Recipients must submit a report to the Provost at the end of the grant period, describing the project and its contributions to their teaching. Recipients will also be expected to share information about their project in a Technology Symposium sponsored by IITS and via a web site linked from the Provost's Office. This will give other Haverford faculty an opportunity to see the variety of technology projects supported by this program. By sharing information and experiences, we hope to encourage innovation and effective use of technologies in the classroom.

    Grant Application Process:

    Interested faculty members should submit a brief description of their project, including the intended goals, via the following form: 2013-14 Teaching with Technology Application. The full proposal shall include a description of the project, a statement of how it will enhance a particular course or help meet a particular pedagogical challenge, and a detailed budget. Projects that can be extended to other courses or disciplines, or which involve more than one faculty member, are encouraged.

  • Student Research Assistant Funds

    Faculty Support Fund

    The Faculty Support Fund provides funding for faculty members to pay for student assistants to support them, primarily during the summer months but also during the academic year.  Faculty at Haverford have regularly, and successfully, used these funds for curricular development, asking students to do research and help plan for a new course, or renovate an existing one.  

    How to apply:

    Applications are solicited by the Provost’s Office on an annual basis in December.  Awards are made in March, and funds are available for one year.


    John B. Hurford '60 Center for Arts and Humanities

    The Hurford Center for Arts and Humanities also sponsors Student Research Assistants, who can be used for curricular development.  Humanities Faculty or Departments may apply for funding of $4,300 to cover student wages and materials for up to 10 weeks of summer work.

    Student Research Assistants 


    Center for Peace and Global Citizenship

    The Center for Peace and Global Citizenship funds six student research assistant positions during the academic year. Research projects should fall within the Center's mission to enable the study, promotion and understanding of peace and global citizenship; they can be used to support curricular development. Full-time and continuing faculty wishing to employ a student researcher (max. 100 hours/student) should submit a short description of the project and the work in which the student would be engaged. Twice yearly application deadlines (fall & spring).

  • Book and Materials Fund

    Haverford provides a number of programs and funds to support teaching at the college, including:

    Tenure-track and continuing faculty members are eligible for $250.00 of funding each year to reimburse expenses for books, software, or other scholarly materials.

    How to apply:
    Please use account number 1013900 and object code 6330 when submitting for reimbursement through Kuali. If you have any questions, please contact Lisa Griffin at lgriffin@haverford.edu.
  • Seed Grants and Brainstorming Grants from the Mellon Tri-College Faculty Forum

    As a result of funding from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the Tri-College Faculty Forum Grant was established to support initiatives and programs that encourage and foster collaborations between faculty at Bryn Mawr, Haverford and Swarthmore Colleges. These collaborations can be in areas of pedagogy, research, and governance/service, and one of the primary goals of the grant is to help strengthen and broaden the intellectual pursuits of faculty in the tri-college community, encourage collaboration and in many cases, encourage interdisciplinary endeavors. The Forum funds four separate initiatives, of which the Brainstorming Grants and Seed Grants can be used for teaching support and curricular development.


    Brainstorming Grants

    Brainstorming grants are available to support tri-co faculty members who share common interests. Awards range from$400-$600, and can be used for lunches, dinners or other gatherings where meaningful discussions, brainstorming sessions, workshops, and interactions can occurwith peers from the three campuses. The goal of the brainstorming grant is to encourage faculty gatherings in order to discuss scholarly interests, curricular projects and program initiatives. The Brainstorming proposal deadline is typically in early November, and notification of the successful grant awards usually follows several weeks later.

    Mellon Tri-College Faculty Forum: Brainstorming Grants


    Seed Grants

    The Seed Grant Fellowships support innovative faculty projects related to research, teaching, curriculum, or service/governance. The grants are flexible as to the nature and scope of the initiatives funded. Projects might include faculty working groups, topical workshops or symposia, exchanges with other liberal arts colleges or universities, invited speakers, travel money for faculty training, etc. Fellowship support includes up to$3,000per project, to reimburse expenses appropriate to the nature of the proposal such as travel, hosting events, small honoraria for outside speakers, materials and equipment, etc.

    Mellon Tri-College Faculty Forum: Seed Grants