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Haverford College
Department of History

All Courses

111 Introduction to Western Civilization SO
L.Gerstein, L.Graham, P.Jefferson
A year-long course that surveys Western European civilization from the fall of Rome to the present. It focuses on the institutional and intellectual dimensions of the western tradition, by closely interrogating both primary sources and secondary accounts. Each semester counts as an independent course. Typically offered every Semester.

114 An Introduction to Global History SO
A.Kitroeff, J.Krippner
A year-long survey of topics in world history from the era of classical empires (Rome, Han China) to the present; with emphasis on the changing relationships among different regions and peoples of the world, and on the geo-politics of point of view in making history and in understanding it. Typically offered every Semester.

118 Introduction to the History of Science SO
D.Hayton
Although science is an essential characteristic of the modern world, it took nearly 4000 years to attain that status. This course surveys various sciences in the past focusing on both how and why humans have interrogated the natural world, how they have categorized the resulting knowledge, and what uses they have made of it. Topics can include science and medicine in antiquity, Islamic sciences, Byzantine and medieval sciences, early-modern science and the Scientific Revolution.

120 Chinese Perspectives on the Individual and Society SO (Cross-listed in East Asian Studies)
P.Smith
A survey of philosophical, literary, legal, and autobiographical sources on Chinese notions of the individual in traditional and modern China. Particular emphasis is placed on identifying how ideal and actual relationships between the individual and society vary across class and gender and over time. Special attention will be paid to the early 20th century, when Western ideas about the individual begin to penetrate Chinese literature and political discourse.

200 Sophomore Seminar: Methods and Approaches in East Asian Studies HU (Cross-listed in East Asian Studies)
H.Glassman
Prerequisite: Required of East Asian Studies majors and minors; open to History majors and other interested students.

207 American Culture and Cultural Criticism from Tocqueville to Today SO
J.Allen
This course will look at America's democratic, commercial, popular, and high culture, and the changing American character, from the days of Alexis de Tocqueville and P.T. Barnum to the twenty-first century, with emphasis on the twentieth century. Classes will revolve around discussions of writings by philosophers, novelists, and social critics who have reflected on or judged this culture and character. Besides Tocqueville, those authors could include Emerson, Mark Twain, William James, John Dewey, Frank Lloyd Wright, H.L.Mencken, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Edmund Wilson, David Riesman, Daniel Boorstin, Herbert Marcuse, Betty Freidan, Christopher Lasch, Neil Postman, Tom Wolfe, and Jacques Barzun. Prerequisite: Not open to freshmen.

209 Modern Latin America SO (Cross-listed in Latin American and Iberian Studies)
J.Krippner
This course surveys Latin American history from the end of colonial rule to the present. Special attention is paid to the social dynamics of class, race, and gender; to the emergence and redefinition of contemporary republics; and to conflict, crisis, and historical change. (Satisfies the social justice requirement.) Typically offered in alternate years.

229 Gender, Sex and Power in Europe, 1550-1800 SO (Cross-listed in Gender and Sexuality Studies)
L.Graham
This course traces the evolving definitions of gender and sexuality in Europe from the Renaissance to the Enlightenment. Primary sources and theoretical readings explore the construction of gender roles and sexuality in different arenas of early modern life such as political thought, law, work, family, art and performance. Topics include masculinity and effeminacy, court culture and power, the rise of print technology and literacy, religious conflict and scientific discovery. Typically offered in alternate years.

233 Perspectives on Civil War and Revolution: Southern Europe and Central America SO (Cross-listed in Political Science)
A.Isaacs, A.Kitroeff
Prerequisite: One course in history or one course in political science

234 Nationalism and Politics in the Balkans SO
A.Kitroeff
The interrelationship of politics with communism and nationalism in the Balkans. The political legacies of the region; the rise of communism and the way in which communist regimes dealt with nationalist issues in each of the region's nation-states; the sharpening of nationalist conflicts in the post-communist era; focusing on the Yugoslav war and the post war efforts to restore democratic rule and resolve nationalist differences equitably. Typically offered in alternate years.

240 History and Principles of Quakerism SO (Cross-listed in Religion and Peace and Conflict Studies)
E.Lapsansky
The development of Quakerism and its relationship to other religious movements and to political and social life, especially in America. The roots of the Society of Friends in 17th-century Britain, and the expansion of Quaker influences among Third World populations, particularly the Native American, Hispanic, east African, and Asian populations.

243 African American Political and Social Thought: Black Modernism, 1895-1945 SO (Cross-listed in Africana Studies)
P.Jefferson
This course reconstructs the emergence of a modern African American intellectual and cultural tradition-in the context of a changing political economy and our national coming of age. Typically offered in alternate years.

244 Russia from 1800-1917 SO (Cross-listed in Russian)
L.Gerstein
Topics considered include the culture of serfdom, Westernization, reforms, modernization, national identities, and Revolution. Typically offered in alternate years.

256 Zen Thought, Zen Culture, Zen History SO (Cross-listed in East Asian Studies and Religion)
H.Glassman

257 The Scientific Revolution SO
D.Hayton
The revolution in the sciences that occurred between 1500 and 1750 completely reshaped our understanding of the natural world and our place in it. Simultaneously, the methods used to interrogate that natural world changed dramatically. This course explores these transformations. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. Typically offered in alternate years.

260 Mid-Imperial China HU (Cross-listed in East Asian Studies)
P.Smith
Prerequisite: Open to sophomores and above.

261 Late Imperial China, 1600-1900 SO (Cross-listed in East Asian Studies)
P.Smith
Surveys Chinese culture and society at the height of the imperial era through the 18th century and the ensuing political and cultural crises catalysed by institutional decline and Western imperialism in the 19th and early 20th centuries. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or above and at least one prior course in History or East Asian Studies.

264 The Social History of Chinese Religions HU (Cross-listed in East Asian Studies)
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or above.

270 From Empire to Nation: The Ottoman World Transformed SO
A.Kitroeff
Introduces students to the historical study of empires and the circumstances and consequences of their collapse by focusing on the Ottoman Empire. A cluster of recent studies treat the history of the Ottoman Empire (1453-1923) as a complex, dynamic and changing entity revising the older perspectives that viewed it as epitomizing the supposedly backward, unchanging, and mysterious Orient. Based on the more accessible works among this new literature, the course examines the transformation of the Ottoman Empire in terms of its political structures, its ties with Islam, its social make-up and its economy, as well as its relationship with Europe and its responses to the forces of modernity. Typically offered in alternate years.

281 Mexican Cultural History: Ancient and Colonial SO (Cross-listed in Latin American and Iberian Studies)
J.Krippner
This course provides an introduction to Mexican cultural history from antiquity through the colonial centuries. Particular attention will be paid to elite and popular understandings and forms of expression as recorded in visual culture, material objects, and the writings of the colonial era. Prerequisite: Hist 111 or 224, or consent of the instructor. Typically offered in alternate years.

282 Mexican Cultural History: Ancient and Colonial SO (Cross-listed in Latin American and Iberian Studies)
J.Krippner
This course provides an introduction to Mexican cultural history from antiquity through the colonial centuries. Particular attention will be paid to elite and popular understandings and forms of expression as recorded in visual culture, material objects, and the writings of the colonial era. Prerequisite: Hist 111 or 224 or consent. Typically offered in alternate years.

298 Latin America and the American Empire HU (Cross-listed in Spanish and Latin American and Iberian Studies)
R.Castillo Sandoval, J.Krippner
(Satisfies the social justice requirement.)

317 Visions of Mexico SO (Cross-listed in Latin American and Iberian Studies)
J.Krippner
This course investigates representation of Mexico and "Mexicandad" (Mexcianness, or Mexican Identity), with an emphasis on the history of images and visual culture in the 19th and 20th Centuries. Our goal is to appreciate, but move beyond, art history in order to understand the social, cultural, and historical factors that construct and are preserved in visual images representing modern Mexico, as well as our responses to them.

343 Black Paris: Art and Ideology in a Modernist Diaspora, 1925-1975 SO (Cross-listed in Africana Studies)
P.Jefferson
This course is a reading and discussion seminar, but it incorporates a significant writing component. Considering expatriation a type of "performance," we will consider-in their political/cultural contexts, local and global-the lives and work of selected African American, Caribbean, and African writers in Paris. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor and at least Sophomore standing.

347 Topics in East Asian History SO (Cross-listed in East Asian Studies)
P.Smith
Topic: China at the Center. An exploration of China's place in the current world history from the 1st through the late 19th centuries, with equal focus on theoretical debates and primary-source observations. Recommended for junors and seniors with prior courses in history. Prerequisite: Upper-class standing.

350 Topics in the History of Science SO
D.Hayton
Courtly Science in the Late Medieval and Early Renaissance Europe. The court was the site not only of political intrigue and royal pageantry, but also of scientific practices and the creation of natural knowledge. Like other activities, the creation of natural knowledge ("science") was shaped by the implicit and explicit rules that governed courtly behavior as well as the political and dynastic goals of the ruler. This course examines how and why scientific knowledge was created, displayed, used and at times performed at different royal and imperial courts in late medieval and Renaissance Europe.

354 Topics in Early Modern Europe SO (Cross-listed in Gender and Sexuality Studies)
L.Graham
Seminar meetings, reports and papers. May be repeated for credit with change of topic. Topic for 2007: Law, Crime and Police in Early Modern Europe. This course explores the history of law, crime, criminality, policing, and punishment in Europe between 1550-1800. Readings combine theoretical and historical materials that highlight how attitudes toward law and crime intersect with other aspects of contemporary social and political life.

356 Topics in Modern European History SO
L.Gerstein
Seminar meetings, reports, and research paper. May be repeated for credit with change of topic. Topics in Modern European History. Topic for fall 2006: "Fin de siecle Europe, 1870-1914: Sex, War, Revolution, and Modern Art."

357 Topics in European History SO
A.Kitroeff
Seminar meetings. May be repeated for credit with change of topic. Topic for Fall 2006: The Idea of Europe. Seminar meetings trace the determining features of what might count as a collective idea of Europe as a political and cultural domain from from the Napoleonic era through the foundation of the European Union. Identifies-with the help of secondary and primary sources-the concerns and convictions, the shifting discursive practices and the different cultural and political languages with which supra-national European identities have been constituted over time.

400 Senior Thesis Seminar SO
L.Graham
A two-semester course designed to develop further the research skills students have acquired as history majors, and to guide them through the extended process of writing an undergraduate thesis. Enrollment limited to senior history majors. Prerequisite: Senior History majors only.

480 Independent Study SO
Staff
Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor.

COURSES AT BRYN MAWR COLLEGE

101 The Historical Imagination
131 Chinese Civilization
203 The High Middle Ages
205 Ancient Greece
242 American Politics and Society 1945-present
247 Topics in German Culture
258 British Empire: Imagining Indias
264 Passages from India: 1800-Present
265 American Colonial Encounters
277 Religion and Dissent in the Middle Ages
283 Modern Middle East/North Africa
303 Topics in American History: Civil War and Memory
326 Topics in Chinese History and Culture
357 Topics in British Empire: Engendering the Nation in the British Empire
368 Topics in Medieval History: The Inquisition
398 Senior Thesis