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Haverford College
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Academic Program: Study Abroad

The Classics Department encourages its students to study abroad in Greece or Italy, usually for a semester in their junior year. Students interested in studying abroad should talk to a member of the Classics faculty. For further information about studying abroad at Haverford, visit International Academic Program. Summaries of the most popular programs in Greece and Italy are listed below, with links to the program websites.

Opportunities for archaeology fieldwork are available through the Bryn Mawr Department of Classical and Near Eastern Archaeology.

College Year in Athens

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College Year in Athens, or CYA, is a study abroad program focused upon the history and civilization of Greece and the East Mediterranean region. Its mission is to offer each student an academically rigorous program of studies combined with the vibrant experience of day-to-day contact with people, monuments, and landscape of Greece.

CYA also offers summer courses. Another possibility for summer study for advanced undergraduates is the 6-week intensive survey of Greek sites under the auspices of the American School of Classical Studies in Athens.

Learn more about College Year in Athens >

Intercollegiate Center for Classical Studies in Rome

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At the "Centro" students can study Latin, Greek, Italian, art history, and the ancient city in Rome; they also take field trips in Rome, Pompeii, and Sicily.

Students planning on studying abroad at the Centro are strongly encouraged to take Roman History (or equivalent) before applying.

Learn more about Intercollegiate Center for Classical Studies in Rome >

Study Abroad Reflection: A Semester at the Centro

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In the spring of 2010 I attended the Intercollegiate Center for Classical Studies: Rome (ICCS), "the Centro" to its members. The Centro is a small (about thirty-six students), academically rigorous program, sharply focused on the study of the Ancient Roman City. My time in Rome afforded me an extraordinary scholastic experience as well as some wonderful opportunities for travel in and sometimes beyond Italy and most importantly time to absorb and share in the life of the Eternal City.

ICCS opened a new dimension of Classics to me in Roman archaeology and urban topography as well as letting me continue my studies of Greek and Latin in a setting with standards comparable to the Bi-Co. While many of the particulars of the Centro's classes will change from year to year on account of the annual appointment of the faculty, what remains constant is their challenge and their often extensive hours. Our structured time spent on site, in museums and in lecture could go up to thirty hours in a standard week, a simultaneously energizing and exhausting experience. The same duality existed in the Centro's social life, the forty-some-odd collection of students, faculty and staff were essentially my world. Extended contact with such typically wonderful and brilliant people was generally very stimulating but as weeks turned to month it could also be quite wearing. Patience for others and for oneself is a prime virtue for Centristi and for all those who study abroad.

~ Asher Reisman '11