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Academic Program: ORALi-Tea 2006

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The Inaugural ORALi-Tea was held on April 6th at Haverford College

We are delighted to report that the inaugural Bi-College ORALi-Tea, an evening for the Oral Reading of Ancient Literature and (also oral) consumption of dessert, was a rip-roaring success. Nearly 50 people packed in to Gest 101 (including a legatio from Swarthmore College) to experience over a dozen (mostly) ancient works performed by students and faculty. There was singing, a bit of dancing (by faculty, so the brevity was for the best), chocolate cake, and of course great works of literature. All in all, a fantastic evening

Program

Sophias…..…....….....…….....................Claire Collins, Emily Lewis, & Elizabeth Shaw
Ask Mr. Menander…..…....….…...........Greg Potestio, David Hartmann, Xander Subashi, & Isabel Clarke
Sappho 102………………….......……..Emily Lewis & Elizabeth Shaw
Homer, Odyssey 1.32–47……...........… Willy Lebowitz, George Reuter, & Evan Rodriguez
Euripides, Medea 410–430……....…..... Christine DeStephan, Molly Higgins-Biddle, & Professor Deborah Roberts
Plato, Symposium (selection)……............Andrew Mihailoff
Demosthenes, On the Crown 3–4....…….Sean Mullin
Petronius, Satyrica 55………...….………Professor Bryce Walker
Martial 5.58…………………...…...……. Professor Bret Mulligan
Horace, Odes 1.24…………...…....……..Arianae Tsavaris
Horace, Odes 1.4………..…....….....……Deirdre Lloyd
Juvenal 5.156–173………....……......…...Jacob Carroll
Persius 3.88–118......…..........…....…...….Claire Collins
Housman, Fragment of a Greek Tragedy...Professors Edmonds, Mulligan, Roberts, and Walker
Vergil, Aeneid 2.571–586…….…….......…Katie Baratz
Gaudeamus Igitur........................................ Omnes

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* Next year we'll use a flash when taking pictures; as a group we are much handsomer (and less blurry) than the photos on this page would suggest.

For more about the performance of ancient literature....

Digital Resources & Bibliography

Through the following links and bibliography, you can listen to a number of performance styles or learn more about how modern scholars have reconstructed the pronunciation and oral style of Greek and Latin.

General Links

S.A.L.V.I.: North American Institute For Living Latin Studies

SORGLL: Society for the Oral Reading of Greek and Latin Literature

Audio Links

Performing Cicero (UCLA): records a series of experiments in the performance of a Ciceronian speech. The goal was less to recreate an 'authentic' performance than to identify some parameters of Roman oratory by considering the demands on voice, gesture, dress, and bearing that delivery under ancient conditions imposed.

Recitations of Homer, Catullus, Virgil, Propertius, & Ovid: [Harvard]

Recitations of Homer, Pindar, Plato, Horace, Virgil, Propertius, Ovid, Seneca, & Tacitus: [Princeton]

Viva Voce: Recitations of Catullus, Horace, Vergil, Ovid, Juvenal, Martial, and Hadrian by Vojin Nedeljkovic

Iliad, Book 1 read by Stanley Lombardo

Aeneid, Book 4 read by Wilfred Stroh

Homer, Aeschylus, & Plato read by Stefan Hagel

Latin on the SORGLL website (Terence, Catullus, Cicero, Horace, Vergil, Seneca, Martial)

Greek on the SORGLL website (Homer, Archilochus, Alcman, Sappho, Pindar, Sophocles, Aristophanes, Demosthenes)

Hear the News in Latin

Select Bibliography

Allen, W.S. Accent and Rhythm. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1973.

--------------. Vox Latina, 2nd ed. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1978.

--------------. Vox Graeca, 3rd ed. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1987.

Daitz, Stephen. “On Reading Homer Aloud: To Pause or Not to Pause.” AJP 1991: 149-60.

--------------. “Further Notes on the Pronunciation of Ancient Greek.” CW 2001-2002: 411-412.

Dillon, Matthew. “The Erasmian Pronunciation of Ancient Greek: A New Perspective.” CW 2000-2001: 323-334.

Fisher, M. M. The Three Pronunciations of Latin: The Claims of Each Presented, and       Special Reasons Given for the Use of the English Mode. New York: D. Appleton and Company, 1885.

Greenberg, Nathan A. “Word Juncture in Latin Prose and Poetry.” TAPhA 1991: 297-333.

Shumaker, Wayne. “Final Vowel Plus –M: A Note on the Reading of Quantitative Latin Verse.” CP 1970: 185-7.

Stanford, W.B. The Sound of Greek. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1967.

Sturtevant, E.H. The Pronunciation of Greek and Latin, 2nd ed. Westport: Greenwood Press, 1977.

Ward, Ralph L. “Evidence for the Pronunciation of Latin,” CW 1962: 161-4; 273-5.

Westaway, F. W. Quantity and Accent in the Pronunciation of Latin. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1913.

Additional bibliography...