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Haverford College
Haverford College Course Catalog

At Bryn Mawr: Growth and Structure of Cities, 2010-2011

DescriptionFacultyMajor RequirementsMinor Requirements3-2 Program in City and Regional PlanningCoursesDepartment Homepage

Description

Students may complete a major or minor in Growth and Structure of Cities. Complementing the major, students may complete a concentration in Environmental Studies or Latin American, Latino, and Iberian Peoples and Cultures. Students also may enter the 3-2 Program in City and Regional Planning, offered in cooperation with the University of Pennsylvania.

The interdisciplinary Growth and Structure of Cities major challenges students to understand the dynamic relationships connecting urban spatial organization and the built environment with politics, economics, cultures and societies worldwide. Core introductory classes present analytic approaches that explore changing forms of the city over time and analyze the variety of ways through which women and men have re-created global urban life through time and across cultures. With these foundations, students pursue their interests through classes in architecture, urban social and economic relations, urban history, studies of planning and the environmental conditions of urban life. Opportunities for internships, volunteering, and study abroad also enrich the major. Advanced seminars further ground the course of study by focusing on specific cities and topics.

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Faculty

Associate Professor and Chair Juan Manuel Arbona,
Senior Lecturer Jeffrey A. Cohen
Professor Carola Hein (on leave semesters I and II)
Professor Gary Wray McDonogh
Visiting Studio Critic Samuel Olshin
Lecturer Ingrid Anne Steffensen
Associate Professor Ellen Stroud
Senior Lecturer Daniela Holt Voith Instructor David Consiglio
Lecturer Shira Walinsky
Lecturer Jane Golden

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Major Requirements

A minimum of 15 courses (11 courses in Cities and four allied courses in other related fields) is required to complete the major. Two introductory courses (185, 190) balance sociocultural and formal approaches to urban form and the built environment, and introduce cross-cultural and historical comparison of urban development. The introductory sequence should be completed with a broader architectural survey course (253, 254, 255) and a second social science course that entails extended analysis (217 or 229). These courses should be completed as early as possible in the first and second years; at least two of them must be taken by the end of the first semester of the sophomore year. Students are encouraged to use other writing intensive classes within the major to develop a range of skills in methods, theory, and presentation.

In addition to these introductory courses, each student selects six elective courses within the Cities Department, including cross-listed courses. At least two must be at the 300 level. In the senior year, a third advanced course is required. Most students join together in a research seminar, CITY 398. Occasionally, however, after consultation with the major advisers, the student may elect another 300-level course or a program for independent research. This is often the case with double majors who write a thesis in another field.

Each student must also identify four courses outside Cities that represent additional expertise to complement her work in the major. These may include courses such as physics and calculus for architects, or special skills in design, language, or regional interests. Any minor, concentration, or second major also fulfills this requirement. Cities courses that are cross-listed with other departments or originate in them can be counted only once in the course selection, although they may be either allied or elective courses.

Both the Cities Department electives and the four or more allied courses must be chosen in close consultation with the major advisers in order to create a strongly coherent sequence and focus. This is especially true for students interested in architecture, who will need to arrange studio time (226, 228) as well as accompanying courses in math, science and architectural history; they should contact the department director or Daniela Voith in their first year. Likewise, students interested in pursuing a concentration in Environmental Studies should consult with Ellen Stroud early in their career, and those interested in pursuing Iberian, Latin American, and Latino/a themes should consult with Gary McDonogh or Juan Arbona. All students will be asked to provide a statement of their interests and goals to enrich the advising process.

Finally, students should also note that many courses in the department are given on an alternate-year basis. Many carry prerequisites in art history, economics, history, sociology, or the natural sciences.

Programs for study abroad or off campus are encouraged, within the limits of the Bryn Mawr and Haverford rules and practices. In general, a one-semester program is strongly preferred. The Cities Department regularly works with off-campus and study-abroad programs that are strong in architectural history, planning, and design, as well as those that allow students to pursue social and cultural interests. Students who would like to spend part or all of their junior year away must consult with the major advisers and appropriate deans early in their sophomore year.

Cities majors have created major plans that have allowed them to coordinate their interests in cities with architecture, planning, ethnography, history, law, environmental studies, mass media, social justice, medicine, public health, the fine arts, and other fields. No matter the focus, though, each Cities major must develop a solid foundation in both the history of architecture and urban form and the analysis of urban culture, experience, and policy. Careful methodological choices, clear analytical writing, and critical visual analysis constitute primary emphases of the major. Strong interaction with faculty and other students are an important and productive part of the Cities Department, which helps us all take advantage of the major's flexibility in an organized and rigorous way.

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Minor Requirements

Students who wish to minor in the Cities Department must take at least two out of the four required courses and four cities electives, including two at the 300 level. Senior Seminar is not mandatory for fulfilling the cities minor.

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3-2 Program in City and Regional Planning

Over the past two decades, many Cities majors have entered the 3-2 Program in City and Regional Planning, offered in conjunction with the University of Pennsylvania. Students interested in this program should meet with Carola Hein early in their sophomore year.

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Courses

CITY B103 Earth System Science and the Environment (Cross-listed as GEOL B103)

D.Barber

CITY B104 Archaeology of Agricultural and Urban Revolutions (Cross-listed as ARCH B104)

P.Magee
Not offered in 2010-11.

CITY B110 The World Through Classical Eyes (Cross-listed as ARCH B110, CTSC B110)

A Donohue

CITY B115 Classical Art (Cross-listed as ARCH B115, CSTS B116, and HART B115)

A.Donohue
Not offered in 2010-11.

CITY B136 Working with Economic Data (Cross-listed as ECON B136)

D.Ross
Not offered in 2010-11.

CITY B160 Daily Life in Ancient Greece and Rome (Cross-listed as ARCH B160 and CSTS B160)

A.Donohue
Not offered in 2010-11.

CITY B175 Environment and Society: History, Place, and Problems (Cross-listed as SOCL B175)

R.Simpson, E.Stroud
This course introduces the ideas, themes, and methodologies of the interdisciplinary field of environmental studies, beginning with definitions: what is nature? what is environment? and how do people and their settlements fit into each? It then examines distinct disciplinary approaches in which scholarship can and does (and does not) inform others. Assignments introduce methodologies of environmental studies, requiring reading landscapes, working with census data and government reports, critically interpreting scientific data, and analyzing work of experts.

CITY B180 Introduction to Urban Planning

Staff
Lecture and technical class that considers broad issues of global planning as well as the skills and strategies necessary to the field. This may also be linked to the study of specific issues of planning such as waterfront development or sustainability. Not offered in 2010-11.

CITY B185 Urban Culture and Society (Cross-listed as ANTH B185)

J.Arbona, G.McDonogh
Examines techniques and questions of the social sciences as tools for studying historical and contemporary cities. Topics include political-economic organization, conflict and social differentiation (class, ethnicity and gender), and cultural production and representation. Philadelphia features prominently in discussion, reading and exploration as do global metropolitan comparisons through papers involving fieldwork, critical reading and planning/problem solving using qualitative and quantitative methods.

CITY B190 The Form of the City: Urban Form from Antiquity to the Present (Cross-listed as ANTH B190 and HART B190)

J.Cohen, I.Steffensen
This course studies the city as a three-dimensional artifact. A variety of factors—geography, economic and population structure, politics, planning, and aesthetics—are considered as determinants of urban form.

CITY B203 Ancient Greek Cities and Sanctuaries (Cross-listed as ARCH B203)

J.Wright
Not offered in 2010-11.

CITY B206 Statistical Methods in Economics (Cross-listed as ECON B203)

R.Stahnke, T.Vartanian
Not offered in 2010-11.

CITY B207 Topics in Urban Studies: Writing Architecture

J.Cohen
An intensive writing course for mid-level students where we explore how we understand and write about architecture and architectural history, including the analysis of visual materials in texts and in real sites.

CITY B209 Medical Anthropology (Cross-listed as ANTH B210)

M.Pashigian
Not offered in 2010-11.

CITY B210 Natural Hazards (Cross-listed as GEOL B209)

A.Weil
Not offered in 2010-11.

CITY B212 Medieval Architecture (Cross-listed as HART B212)

D.Kinney
Not offered in 2010-11.

CITY B213 Taming the Modern Corporation (Cross-listed as ECON B213)

D.Ross, D.Alger
Not offered in 2010-11.

CITY B214 Public Finance (Cross-listed as ECON B214)

M.Weinberg

CITY B215 Urban Economics (Cross-listed as ECON B215)

R.Stahnke

CITY B217 Research Methods and Theories

J.Arbona
This course will provide the student with the basic skills to design and implement a research project. The emphasis will be on the process (and choices) of constructing a research project and on “learning by doing.” The course will encompass both quantitative and qualitative techniques and will examine the strengths and weaknesses of each strategy. By the end of the semester students will have learned the basics for planning and executing research on a topic of their choice.

CITY B218 Globalization and the City

J.Arbona
This course introduces students to contemporary issues related to the urban built environment in Africa, Asia and Latin America (collectively referred to as the Third World or developing countries) and the implications of recent political and economic changes. Not offered in 2010-11.

CITY B222 Introduction to Environmental Issues: Policy-Making in Comparative Perspective (Cross-listed as POLS B222)

C.Hager
Not offered in 2010-11.

CITY B225 Economic Development (Cross-listed as ECON B225)

M.Rock

CITY B226 Introduction to Architectural Design

S.Olshin, D.Voith
This studio design course introduces the principles of architectural design. Prerequisites: Drawing, some history of architecture, and permission of instructor.

CITY B227 Topics in Modern Planning (Cross-listed as HART B227)

C.Hein
This course examines topics in planning as defined by specific areas (modern European metropoles) or themes (the impact of oil). It is a writing intensive course. Not offered in 2010-11.

CITY B228 Problems in Architectural Design Advanced Architecture and Urban Design

S.Olshin, D.Voith
A continuation of CITY 226 at a more advanced level. Prerequisites: CITY 226 or other comparable design work and permission of instructor.

CITY B229 Comparative Urbanism Divided Cities: Race, Class, Gender, and Other Divisions (Cross-listed as ANTH B229, EAST B229 and SOCL B230)

G.McDonogh
This class builds upon foundations in urban social sciences and visual methods through the systematic comparative examination of four major global cities—Hong Kong, Paris, São Paulo, and Los Angeles—as arenas in which social and cultural divisions are lived, challenged, and recreated. By limiting ourselves to a few cases studied in depth through multiple drafts of a comparative research problem we can explore theoretical and methodological issues raised by divisions that structure everyday life, rights, space, and opportunities. This also allows us to link data and methods to theory, with special reference to critical theories on race, class, gender and identity. Limited to 25 with preference to Cities majors.

CITY B234 Environmental Economics (Cross-listed as ECON B234)

D.Ross

CITY B237 Themes in Modern African History: Urbanization in Africa (Cross-listed as HIST B237)

K.Ngalamulume
Not offered in 2010-11.

CITY B238 The Economics of Globalization (Cross-listed as ECON B236)

J.Ceglowski
Not offered in 2010-11.

CITY B242 Urban Field Research Methods (Cross-listed as SOCL B242)

A.Takenaka

CITY B244 Great Empires of the Ancient Near East (Cross-listed as ARCH B244, HIST B244, and POLS B244)

M.Atac
Not offered in 2010-11.

CITY B247 Topics in German Cultural Studies (Cross-listed as GERM B223 and HIST B247)

D.Kenosian
Not offered in 2010-11.

CITY B248 Modern Middle East Cities (Cross-listed as POLS B248 and HEBR B248)

D.Harrold
Not offered in 2010-11.

CITY B249 Asian American Communities (Cross-listed as ANTH B249 and SOCL B249)

A.Takenaka

CITY B250 Twentieth Century U.S. Urban History: Philadelphia Architecture (Cross-listed as HIST B251)

J.Cohen
This course explores the recent history of U.S. cities as both physical spaces and social entities. How have the definitions, political roles, and social perceptions of U.S. cities changed since 1900? And how have those shifts, along with changes in transportation, communication, construction, and other technologies affected both the people and places that comprise U.S. cities? In 2010-2011, the class will use the built environment of Philadelphia to tackle these issues.

CITY B251 La Mosaïque France (Cross-listed as FREN B251)

B.Cherel
Not offered in 2010-11.

CITY B253 Survey of Western Architecture (Cross-listed as HART B253 and HIST B253)

D.Cast
Not offered in 2010-11.

CITY B254 History of Modern Architecture (Cross-listed as HART B254)

I.Steffensen
A survey of the development of modern architecture since the 18th century. The course concentrates on the period since 1890, especially in Europe and North America.

CITY B255 Survey of American Architecture (Cross-listed as HART B255)

I.Steffensen
An examination of landmarks, patterns, landscapes, designers, and motives in the creation of the American built environment over four centuries. The course will address the master narrative of the traditional survey course, while also probing the relation of this canon to the wider realms of building in the United States.

CITY B258 L'Espace réinventé (Cross-listed as FREN B258)

Staff
Not offered in 2010-11.

CITY B260 Show and Spectacle in Ancient Greece and Rome (Cross-listed as CSTS B255, ARCH B255 and HIST B285)

A.Baertschi, R.Scott, J.Wright
Not offered in 2010-11.

CITY B266 Schools in American Cities (Cross-listed as EDUC B266 and SOCL B266)

Jody Cohen

CITY B267 Philadelphia, 1682 to Present (Cross-listed as HIST B267)

E.Shore
Not offered in 2010-11.

CITY B276 Philadelphia Mural Arts History, Activism, Design

Jody Cohen, J.Golden, S.Walinsky
Philadelphia is home to 3,000 murals. Students will explore this exciting movement in civic activism and the arts, leading the design and execution of a legacy mural project celebrating Bryn Mawr's 125th. Students will gain experience with community organizing for this project, in Philadelphia as well as on campus.

CITY B278 American Environmental History (Cross-listed as HIST B278)

E.Stroud
This course explores major themes of American environmental history, examining changes in the American landscape, development of ideas about nature and the history of environmental activism. Students will study definitions of nature, environment, and environmental history while investigating interactions between Americans and their physical worlds.

CITY B286 Themes in British Empire (Cross-listed as HIST B286 and POLS B286)

M.Kale
Not offered in 2010-11.

CITY B287 Urbanism as a Way of Life (Cross-listed as SOCL B287)

R.Simpson
Not offered in 2010-11.

CITY B293 Topics in Film, Television, and Media (Cross-listed as HART 293)

J.Nasser
An examination of approaches and topics in international media, using social science, historical and humanistic techniques. In 2010, the class will focus on "Fragmented Cities" dealing with issues of gender, ethnicity and identity in U.S., Latino and Latin American media.

CITY B299 Cultural Diversity and Its Representations (Cross-listed as GERM B299 and COML B299)

A.Seyhan
Not offered in 2010-11.

CITY B301 Topics in Modern Architecture: Cars and the City

I.Steffensen
This course will examine the role of the automobile in the development of architecture and urbanism in the twentieth century. From the invention of the horseless carriage to Henry Ford's development of the assembly line, to the postwar explosion of car production and ownership, we will trace the technological development of the automobile. We will also examine the interaction between the automobile and the single-family residence; the growth of cities and suburbs in relation to the automobile; and how the automobile plays a defining role in shaping the spaces of modern life.

CITY B305 Ancient Athens (Cross-listed as ARCH B305)

A.Lindenlauf
Not offered in 2010-11.

CITY B306 Advanced Fieldwork Techniques: Places in Time

J.Cohen
A workshop for research into the histories of places, intended to bring students into contact with some of the raw materials of architectural and urban history. A focus will be placed on historical images and texts, and on creating engaging informational experiences that are transparent to their evidentiary basis.

CITY B308 Topics in Photography (Cross-listed as HART B308)

Staff
Not offered in 2010-11.

CITY B319 Advanced Topics in German Cultural Studies (Cross-listed as GERM B321, COML B321 and HART B348)

I.Meyer, D.Kenosian
Not offered in 2010-11.

CITY B321 Technology and Politics (Cross-listed as POLS B321)

C.Hager
Not offered in 2010-11.

CITY B322 Topics in German Literature (Cross-listed as GERM B310)

D.Kenosian
Not offered in 2010-11.

CITY B323 Topics in Renaissance Art

D.Cast
Not offered in 2010-11.

CITY B325 Topics in Social History: The Body (Cross-listed as HIST B325)

E.Stroud
This topics class explores major themes in American social history. This year, the class will focus on the history of the American body, investigating the ways in which both living and dead human bodies have shaped and been shaped by American culture, landscapes, and institutions.

CITY B328 Analysis of Geospatial Data Using GIS (Cross-listed as GEOL B328, ARCH B328 and BIOL B328)

D.Consiglio
An introduction to analysis of geospatial data, theory, and the practice of geospatial reasoning. As part of this introduction students will gain experience in using one or more GIS software packages and be introduced to data gathering in the field by remote sensing. Each student is expected to undertake an independent project that uses the approaches and tools presented.

CITY B330 Comparative Economic Sociology (Cross-listed as SOCL B330)

M.Osirim
Not offered in 2010-11.

CITY B331 Palladio and Neo-Palladianism (Cross-listed as HART B331)

D.Cast
Not offered in 2010-11.

CITY B335 Mass Media and the City (Cross-listed as ANTH B335)

G.McDonogh
Maps and murals, newspapers and graffiti, theater and internet—how do they pattern how we imagine cities, dwell in them, or battle for our places within them? This seminar entails a critical examination of the crucial nexus of cities, modernities and media, drawing on theoretical models from linguistics, communication, film and cultural studies, and Marxist analysis while exploring case materials from the Americas, Asia, Africa, and Europe. Students will be expected to critique models and cases while anchoring their own research in a portfolio about a single city. Limited to 15; For advanced students with preference to Cities majors.

CITY B338 The New African Diaspora: African and Caribbean Immigrants in the United States (Cross-listed as SOCL B338)

M.Osirim
Not offered in 2010-11.

CITY B345 Advanced Topics in Environment and Society: Environmental Justice (Cross-listed as SOCL B346)

E.Stroud
This topics class explores major themes of American environmental history, examining changes in the American landscape, the development of ideas about nature, and the history of environmental politics. This year, the class will focus on questions of environmental equity and environmental justice.

CITY B348 Culture and Ethnic Conflict (Cross-listed as POLS B348)

M.Ross
Not offered in 2010-11.

CITY B355 Topics in the History of London (Cross-listed as HART B355)

D.Cast
Not offered in 2010-11.

CITY B360 Topics in Urban Culture and Society: Cities, Nature and Identities in Brazil (Cross-listed as ANTH B359 and HART B359)

G.McDonogh
With a population nearing 200,000,000 Brazil is the fifth largest nation by both size and population in the world. In five hundred years of history and culture, moreover, it also has become an arena for profound ecological transformation, intense social debate over race, class, and culture, and exciting proposals for the transformation of cities and society. This class entails an overview of the negotiation of cities, citizenship, and ecology, from the tensions of Amazonia and coastal settlement to colonial structures of natural and human exploitation through the development of imperial and post-imperial society. It pays particular attention to Brazilian imaginations.

CITY B377 Topics in Modern Architecture: The Architecture of Art Museums (Cross-listed as HART B377)

I.Steffensen
This course begins with the European origins of the art museum in palaces and private residences, and follows the development of the art museum as an institution both in Europe and the United States, as well as the architecture that emerged to answer the needs of this burgeoning institution. Given the cultural preeminence of the art museum, the response of architects to the challenge of designing these emblematic institutions was to push boundaries, make statements, and develop ambitious plans that were often extreme in terms of size, design, and technological developments. Not offered in 2010-11.

CITY B378 Formative Landscapes: The Architecture and Planning of American Collegiate Campuses

J.Cohen
An exploration of the architecture, planning, and visual rhetoric of American collegiate campuses from their early history to the present. Historical consideration of architectural trends and projected imageries will be complemented by student exercises involving documentary research on design genesis, typological contexts, and critical reception. Not offered in 2010-11.

CITY B398 Senior Seminar

J.Arbona, J.Cohen, G.McDonogh
An intensive research seminar designed to guide students in writing a senior thesis.

CITY B403 Independent Study

J.Arbona, J.Cohen, G.McDonogh, E.Stroud

CITY B415 Teaching Assistant

J.Arbona, J.Cohen, G.McDonogh, E.Stroud
An exploration of course planning, pedagogy and creative thinking as students work to help others understand pathways they have already explored in introductory and writing classes. This opportunity is available only to advanced students of highest standing by professorial invitation.

CITY B425 Cities: Praxis Independent Study

Staff
A collective opportunity for students to come together on the basis of engagement in praxis in the greater Philadelphia area; internships generally must be arranged prior to registration for the semester in which the internship is taken. Limited to five students per semester by permission of the instructor.

CITY B450 Urban Internships/Praxis

Staff
Individual opportunities to engage in praxis in the greater Philadelphia area; internships must be arranged prior to registration for the semester in which the internship is taken. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

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