Exhibits & Programs

Zoe Strauss: Sea Change
January 23–March 6, 2015

In Sea Change, celebrated Philadelphia photographer Zoe Strauss traces the landscape of post-climate change America.

In photographs, vinyl prints, and projected images, Strauss treads the extended aftermath of three ecological disasters: Hurricane Katrina in the Mississippi Gulf Coast (2005); the BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill in Southern Louisiana (2010); and Hurricane Sandy in Toms River, NJ and Staten Island, NY (2012). Lush and leveled landscapes; graffiti pleas and words of encouragement—Strauss’ camera captures lives decimated and dusting off: the fast and slow tragedies of global warming, the damage we can repair, and the damage we can’t.

Zoe Strauss: Sea Change is made possible with the support of the John B. Hurford ’60 Center for the Arts and Humanities and the Mellon Creative Residencies Program, Haverford College.

This is my hometown

Zoe Strauss, This is my hometown, Toms River, NJ, 2012.
© Zoe Strauss

Show Hours

Mon–Fri: 11 a.m.–5 p.m.
Wednesday: 11 a.m.–8 p.m.
Sat–Sun: 12 p.m.–5 p.m.

Gallery Talk with the Artist

Friday, January 23, 2015
4:30 p.m.—5:30 p.m.

Opening Reception

Friday, January 23, 2015
5:30 p.m.—7:30 p.m.


English
Spanish
  • Archaeologies of Destruction, 1958-2014
    March 20–May 1, 2015

    Curated by Jennifer Burris Staton

    “A deliberate wave of destruction travels over matter we consider permanent. Time corrodes matter and in the course of this corrosion, beauty emerges… Time is the great critic: terrible and implacable, it destroys the worthless and rescues from obscurity that which is truly valuable. All destruction releases an enormous amount of energy. It is through this dynamic impact, this driving action, that destruction lays the foundations for all future creation.”

    Economic turmoil, technologies of violence, and militaristic regimes dominated Latin American politics and society during the 1950s and '60s. In this context, a constellation of artists sought to neutralize the potential horror of such change by displacing destruction into the symbolic realm of art, seeking ritualistic experiences of mediated transformation. "Destruction is, for the artist, the supreme order of freedom," wrote Argentine poet and art critic Aldo Pellegrini in his 1961 manifesto. This exhibition traces the archaeological remnants and histories of this movement as they continue to reverberate in our present.

    Arqueologías de destrucción/Archaeologies of Destruction, 1958-2014 is made possible with support from the John B. Hurford '60 Center for the Arts and Humanities and Mellon Creative Residencies.

  • Arqueologías de destrucción, 1958-2014
    (20 Marzo - 1 Mayo, 2015)

    Curadora: Jennifer Burris Staton

    “A la materia que consideramos inmóvil la recorre una lenta ola de destrucción. El tiempo corroe la materia y en el transcurso de esa corrosión surge la belleza... El tiempo es el gran crítico: terrible e implacable, destruye lo que no tiene valor y rescata de la oscuridad lo que realmente vale. Toda destrucción libera una enorme cantidad de energía. Es a través de este impacto dinámico, de esta acción impulsora, que la destrucción sienta las bases de toda creación futura.”

    La inestabilidad económica, las tecnologías de la violencia y los regímenes militares dominaron la vida política y social de América Latina durante los años cincuenta y sesenta. En este contexto, una constelación de artistas intentó neutralizar el horror latente de dicho cambio, desplazando la destrucción hacia al ámbito simbólico del arte en una búsqueda de experiencias rituales de transformación mediada. “La destrucción pertenece para el artista al orden supremo de la libertad”, declaró el poeta y crítico argentino Aldo Pellegrini en su manifiesto de 1961. Esta exposición recorre los restos arqueológicos y las historias de este movimiento mientras siguen resonando en nuestro presente.

    Arqueologías de destrucción/Archaeologies of Destruction, 1958-2014 se realiza con el apoyo del Centro para las Artes y Humanidades John B. Hurford '60 y de las Residencias Creativas Mellon.

Untitled (Gunpowder Silueta Series)

Ana Mendieta, Untitled (Gunpowder Silueta Series), 1981. Still from super-8mm black and white, silent film transferred to DVD.
© The Estate of Ana Mendieta Collection, L.L.C. Courtesy Galerie Lelong, New York.

Show Hours

Mon–Fri: 11 a.m.–5 p.m.
Wednesday: 11 a.m.–8 p.m.
Sat–Sun: 12 p.m.–5 p.m.

Curator Tour

Friday, March 20, 2015
4:30 p.m.—5:30 p.m.

Opening Reception

Friday, March 20, 2015
5:30 p.m.—7:30 p.m.


2015 Fine Arts Senior Thesis Exhibition
May 8–17, 2015

The Fine Arts Senior Thesis Exhibition will represent the culmination of the studies at Haverford College for the eight seniors graduating in 2015.

For each senior, the work in the exhibition will represent the highlights of an intense, year-long studio experience, during which they will shape a coherent body of work by mastering the techniques and visual vocabulary within a particular concentration.

  • Alexis Etzkorn — painting
  • Elizabeth Fawcett — sculpture
  • Marissa Gibson-Garcia — sculpture/printmaking
  • Claudia Keep — painting
  • Angelica Ortiz — drawing
  • Brianna Riccobene — printmaking
  • Pamudu Tennakoon — sculpture
  • Siyang You — painting

The 2015 Fine Arts Senior Thesis exhibition is made possible with the support of the Department of Fine Arts and the John B. Hurford '60 Center for the Arts and Humanities.

Fine Arts seniors graduating in 2015.
Show Hours

Mon–Fri: 11 a.m.–5 p.m.
Wednesday: 11 a.m.–8 p.m.
Sat–Sun: 12 p.m.–5 p.m.

Opening Reception

Friday, May 8, 2015
5:30 p.m.—7:30 p.m.