Exhibits & Programs

Prison Obscura
Friday, January 24—Friday, March 7, 2014

Curated by Prison Photography editor Pete Brook, Prison Obscura presents rarely seen vernacular, surveillance, evidentiary, and prisoner-made photographs, shedding light on the prison industrial complex.

Why do tax-paying, prison-funding citizens rarely get the chance to see such images? And what roles do these pictures play for those within the system? Alyse Emdur's collected letters and prison visiting room portraits, as well as Robert Gumpert's audio-recorded stories from within the San Francisco jail system provide an opportunity to see, read and listen to subjects in the contexts of their incarceration. Juvenile and adult prisoners in different workshops led by Steve Davis, Mark Strandquist and Kristen S. Wilkins perform for the camera, reflect on their past, describe their memories and self-represent through photographs.

The exhibit moves between these intimate portrayals and expansive views of legal and spatial surveillance in works like Josh Begley's manipulated Google Maps' API code and Paul Rucker's animated video work. With stark aesthetic detail and meticulous documentation, Prison Obscura builds the case that Americans must come face to face with these images and imaging technologies both to grasp the cancerous proliferation of the U.S. prison system and to connect with those it confines.

Visit Site

Alyse Emdur, Kimberly Buntyn, Valley State Prison for Women, Chowchilla, California

Gallery Talk with the Curator

Friday, January 24, 2014
4:30 p.m.—5:30 p.m.

Opening Reception

Friday, January 24, 2014
5:30 p.m.—7:30 p.m.


if I can't dance to it, it's not my revolution
Friday, March 21—Friday, May 2, 2014

if I can't dance to it, it's not my revolution takes as its starting point a maxim by anarchist feminist Emma Goldman to examine the political movement of anarchism through counter-cultural artistic practices.

Including works from the 1960s to today, the exhibition proposes three interlinked topics: "Free Love," "Horizontal," and "Black." Each platform features archival documentation, works by self-identified anarchist artists, and pieces that both affirm and complicate strategies of disruption and resistance. Curated by Natalie Musteata, if I can't dance to it anchors a variety of programs including a film series on the anarchist tradition.

Visit Site

Aldo Tambellini, Black TV, 1968

Gallery Talk with the Curator

Friday, March 21, 2014
4:30 p.m.—5:30 p.m.

Opening Reception

Friday, March 21, 2014
5:30 p.m.—7:30 p.m.