Publications

Body Text

The student-edited Body Text publishes the sharpest undergraduate scholarship by Haverford students in the Humanities and Social Sciences.

The editors believe that students' academic writing should travel beyond the classroom and through larger interdisciplinary circuits. Body Text aims to showcase provocative student writing and facilitate conversations across the disciplines.

JOIN THE BODY TEXT EDITORIAL BOARD

  • Submit to Body Text

    We look for papers that are accessible, clearly argued, and stimulating. If your paper is selected for publication, we'll work with you through a collaborative editing process to prepare the final version for the journal and its audience. The entire review process is anonymous up until the point of selection.

    Remove all identifying information from the essay, write an abstract (around 200 words) if the paper doesn't have one already, and email it as a Word document (.doc or .docx) to bodytext.journal@gmail.com. Your essay should arrive as an email with the subject "Body Text Submission, [Paper Title]." Submissions must be formatted in the citation style appropriate to the standards of the paper's discipline. We are accepting papers through the end of the semester.

  • Body Text

    Volume 2, 2012-2013

    Featuring the work of Ryan Rebel’14, Neilay Shah’14, Micah Walter’14, Lizzie Douglas ’13, and the Body Text Editorial Board.

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Past Issues


Margin

Margin is Haverford's themed student-edited publication.

Each issue features a topic marginalized in academic discourses, presenting submissions of critical essays, reviews, creative writing, visual media, and any other artifacts that critically or creatively engage the theme. The Margin Editorial Board seeks to publish the work of students, scholars, artists, musicians, and writers, both from within and outside of the Haverford community.

JOIN THE MARGIN EDITORIAL BOARD

  • Upcoming Issue: Cash

    What is cash? The word itself comes from the French caisse, or “money box.” “Cash” today refers to money in hand. Cold hard cash. It’s tactile. Meanwhile “money” is ever more abstract. Cash has given way to online shopping and credit cards and indebtedness as a perennial state of being. As the relationship between cash and money grows tenuous, money moves toward the abstract, straddling the line between the conceptual and the concrete.

    How do you imbue the thin bill with the intangible value of “cash”? One might argue that society has overachieved in facing this dilemma. This debate over value has intensified in the past decade: does value exist in the stock ticker? Where is financial security in an economy of speculation? How can one exchange value while sidestepping the world of cash? How do we appropriate, reject, transform, and deploy this cultural and economic touchstone within our lives, language, economy and imagination? Even as the aura of “cash” has been disseminated into the popular lexicon (“cultural capital,” “wealth of knowledge,” “safe bet,” “gold standard”), have our doubts regarding the stability and value of “cash” made problematic our cultural dependence on the subject?

  • Submit to Margin

    Successful submissions will ultimately be transferrable across media, disciplines, and cultural traditions.

    Deadline for Submission: 11:59 p.m., Friday February 14

    Send submissions and questions to: margin.journal@gmail.com. Your submission should arrive as an email with the subject heading: "Cash, [Submission Title]."

    Required format: Written pieces must be submitted as Word documents with a .doc or .docx extension. Academic submissions must use proper Chicago citation style. Visual pieces must be saved as high-quality .tiff files. If your submission is beyond our formatting capabilities (a video, a song, something three-dimensional, etc.) let us know. If we like it, we’ll make it work. Longer submissions will be edited for brevity in consultation with the author.

  • Deploying Terror

    Volume 2, Spring 2013

    Deploying Terror asks scholars, writers, and artists to consider the languages and images generated and deployed by the events of September 11, 2001.

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Past Issues