Past Faculty Funding

Access Grants

  • 2013-14

    Professor of English Raji Mohan visited the James Joyce and Ulysses exhibit at the James Joyce Center in Dublin, Ireland.

  • 2012-13

    Professor of East Asian Studies Hank Glassman went to New York City for two events: a lecture on and performance of the Japanese narration genre known as kôdan, a form of early modern popular entertainment especially famous for the recitation of war tales at the Donald Keene Center for Japanese Culture at Columbia University and the Columbia Seminar in Buddhist Studies featuring a prominent South Korean scholar of ancient Indian Buddhist art, Juhyung Rhi.

    Professor of Linguistics Brook Danielle Lillehaugen visited the Zapotec archival collections within the Tozzer Library at Harvard University, Cambridge, MA. The Tozzer's special collections is home to early copies of rare Zapotec manuscripts from early Colonial Mexico.

  • 2011-12

    Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow and visiting Professor of History Farid Azfar visited the recently reopened Islamic Art Wing at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, NY.

    Professor of Spanish and Comparative Literature Israel Burshatin visited the recently reopened Islamic Art Wing at the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Whitney Biennial in New York, NY.

    Professor of East Asian Studies Hank Glassmanattended an International Symposium on Japanese Visual Culture: Performance, Media and Text at Columbia University in New York, NY.

  • 2010-11

    Associate Professor of Fine Arts Markus Baenziger took his students to visit a selection of galleries in Chelsea, SOHO, and the Lower East Side of New York in Fall 2010.

    Visiting Assistant Professor of English Thomas Devaney took students to see the paintings of Cezanne at the Barnes Foundation on October 26, 2010.

    Associate Professor of History Lisa Jane Graham attended a performance of King Lear at the BAM Harvey Theater on June 4, 2011 as a way to enhance teaching Shakespeare in her 200- and 300- level history courses.

    Visiting Assistant Professor of Philosophy Joshua Delpech-Ramey attended Wagner's Das Rheingold at the Metropolitan Opera in New York on October 4, 2010 as research towards the development of his Spring 2011 course in ethics and critical theory on the politics of music.

    Visiting Instructor of Religion Jamel Velji traveled to New York to visit the "Three Faiths" exhibit at the New York Public Library on December 3 - 4, 2010 as part of preparation for his Spring 2011 course "Sacred Texts and Religious Traditions."

  • 2009-10

    A freshman writing class saw King Lear with Aryeh Kosman (Philosophy Emeritus); Ulrich Schönherr (German)'s "Music-Text-Performance" class attended a performance of Mozart, The Magic Flute; Darin Hayton (History)'s "Collecting Nature, Displaying Authority" students visited Philadelphia's Mütter Museum of medical anomalies; Carol Solomon (History of Art)'s "Paris in the 19th Century: Art, Visual Culture, and the Psychopathology of the Modern City" course visited the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York; Naomi Koltun-Fromm (Religion)'s "Jerusalem: City, History, and Representation" students saw a performance of Lessing, Nathan the Wise; Linda Gerstein (History)'s "Europe: 1870-1914" students saw Alan Bennett's The Habit of Art; and Paul Smith (Political Science)'s "East Meets West" class visited the Philadelphia Museum of Art.

  • 2008-09

    Hank Glassman (East Asian Studies) used an Access/Enrichment Grant to see "Art of the Korean Renaissance 1400-1600" at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.

  • 2007-08

    In 2007-8, an Access Grant enabled Israel Burshatin (Spanish and Comparative Literature) to visit art museums and exhibitions while he was in Europe in preparation for his work on the Clarissa Sligh: Photographs exhibit, including trips to the Venice Biennale; and in Germany, the Documenta Museum in Kassel and a sculpture show in Münster.

    As research for a new book project, Richard Freedman (Music) traveled to New York City to view an exhibition at the Morgan Library focusing on the library of Federico da Montefeltro, the Duke of Urbino, one of the great Renaissance patrons. While on sabbatical in France, David Sedley (French) visited the home of Michel de Montaigne (Château de Montaigne), the Renaissance author who is at the center of his teaching and research.

    Lisa Jane Graham (History), also working in France, attended the concert and lecture Le Salon de Diderot at the Cité de la Musique and took in a production of Moliere's Dom Juan at the Théâtre Marigny.

  • 2006-07

    Hank Glassman (East Asian Studies)
    Lisa Jane Graham (History)
    Laurie Hart (Anthropology)

  • 2005-06

    Hank Glassman Hank Glassman (East Asian Studies) attended an Exhibit at the Asia Society, New York.;
    Lisa Jane Graham (History) attended the Globe Theatre's U.S. tour production of "Measure for Measure" during its run at the University of Pennsylvania;
    Laura McGrane to attended a production of Royall Tyler's "The Contrast" (1786) at the Mirror Repertory Theatre in New York.

Course Innovation/Renovation Grants

  • 2013-14

    Alice Lesnick, Professor in the BiCo Education Program, worked to renovate her course, "Empowering Learners: Health Literacies in Context," with a residency of Dance/Movement Therapist, Emily Nussdorfer.

    Professor Carol Shilling of the Writing Program hosted Philadelphia Sculptor Susan Hagen to discuss her work with students in Shilling's "Bodies of Injustice: Health, Illness, and Healing in Contexts of Inequality" class. Susan Hagen’s process of working with a diverse range of people to create her small-scale wooden sculptures establishes solidarity with and dignifies her subjects. She brings to her work an expansive, Whitman-like respect for human complexity and a deep interest in marginalized people and social justice.

  • 2012-13

    Terrence Johnson (Religion) brought Joseph Winters, Assistant Professor of Religion, University of North Carolina, Charlotte to visit his “Religion and the Limits of Liberalism” course as well as deliver the public talk "Ellison, Jazz, and the Tragedy of Democratic Life."

    Danielle Macbeth (Philosophy) purchased volumes from the Handbooks of the History of Logic series for her course “Historical Introduction to Logic” with support from a Course Innovation/Renovation Grant.

    Professor of Religion Travis Zadeh brought Daniel Sheffield, Lecturer in Near Eastern Languages and Link-Cotsen Postdoctoral Fellow in the Society of Fellows at Princeton University, to Haverford to speak with his seminar “Religion and Translation” on the Zoroastrian traditions of translating the Avesta.

    For his Method & Theory in the Study of Religion Jamel Velji brought Assistant Professor Michael Jerryson from Eckerd College to Haverford to discuss his path-breaking work on the relationships between religious studies theory and manifestations of violence in Southern Thailand.

  • 2011-12

    Professor of English Christian DuComb hosted Alena Smith '02, a prizewinning playwright and Haverford alum, for a lecture and to lead a discussion on her play "The Bad Guys" in ENGLH297B01. She also attended a staged reading of her play "The Lacy Project" (directed by Christian DuComb, with student actors) and participated in a post-show discussion.

    Professors Ashok Gangadean (Philosophy) Indradeep Ghosh (Economics) and Joshua Ramey (Writing Program) brought author and speaker Charles Eisenstein to Haverford for a campus-wide lecture and two class visits. Eisenstein is the renowned author of "The Ascent of Humanity: The Age of Separation, the Age of Reunion, and the Convergence of Crises that is birthing the transition."

    Professor of Religion Tracey Hucks hosted retired History Professor Paul Jefferson for weeklong intensive focusing Jefferson's engagement with students around James Baldwin's famous text, "The Fire Next Time."

    Professor of History Jim Krippner hosted Harvard historian and alumnus Jonathan M. Hansen '84 who discussed his book, "In Guantánamo: An American History," the first complete account of a notorious and fascinating place.

  • 2010-11

    Visiting Instructor for the Writing Program Christian DuComb renovated the course "Carnival in Performance from the Acropolis to Mardi Gras." The course examined carnival and the carnivalesque in several cultural contexts.

    Associate Professor of East Asian Studies Hank Glassman renovated his class "Zen Thought, Zen Culture, Zen History" to include meditation study.

  • 2009-10

    Course Innovation/Renovation Grant
    The Humanities Center helped to defray the costs of an experimental History Department internal-seminar: "Doing History and Literature which was open to all students.

    Course Enhancement Grants
    These grants funded multiple course excursions: a freshman writing class saw King Lear with Aryeh Kosman (Philosophy Emeritus); Ulrich Schönherr (German)'s "Music-Text-Performance" class attended a performance of Mozart, The Magic Flute; Darin Hayton (History)'s "Collecting Nature, Displaying Authority" students visited Philadelphia's Mütter Museum of medical anomalies; Carol Solomon (History of Art)'s "Paris in the 19th Century: Art, Visual Culture, and the Psychopathology of the Modern City" course visited the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York; Naomi Koltun-Fromm (Religion)'s "Jerusalem: City, History, and Representation" students saw a performance of Lessing, Nathan the Wise; Linda Gerstein (History)'s "Europe: 1870-1914" students saw Alan Bennett's The Habit of Art; and Paul Smith (Political Science)'s "East Meets West" class visited the Philadelphia Museum of Art. In 09-10, HHC initiatives even resulted in the creation of new courses: "Blake's Religion in Word & Image" (Religion/English) and "Race, Culture, Representation: Blacks and Jews in America" (Religion/Africana and African Studies).

  • 2008-09

    Course Innovation/Renovation Grants
    Travis Zadeh (Religion) received an Innovation/Renovation Grant for the courses "Mystical Literature of Islam" and "The Qur'an," as did Brett Mulligan (Classics) for Vergilathon 2008, a day-long public reading of Vergil's Aeneid.

    Course Enhancement Grant
    Students saw Tom Stoppard's Rock 'n Roll with Gus Stadler, English; explored Cezanne and Beyond at the Philadelphia Museum of Art and visited the Barnes Foundation with Carol Solomon (History of Art) and Lisa McCormick (Sociology); toured the historic Laurel Hill Cemetery with Naomi Koltun-Fromm (Religion); and took in an evening of jazz with John Hollenbeck's Large Ensemble with Richard Freedman (Music).

  • 2007-08

    Course Innovation/Renovation Grant
    Terrence Johnson (Religion) added supplemental books, field trips, and a speaker visit to his course "Black Religion and Liberation Thought."

    Course Enhancement Grants
    Josh Dubler (Religion) took his "Religion in Philadelphia" class to visit Christ Church, the Masonic Lodge, and Eastern State Penitentiary. Naomi Koltun-Fromm (Religion) took her class to the University of Pennsylvania's Museum of Anthropology and Archaeology to see an exhibit on Biblical and Near Eastern archaeology. Graciela Michelotti (Spanish) and students from her "Evita and her Sisters" course attended the Frida Kahlo exhibit at the Philadelphia Museum of Art.

  • 2006-07

    Darin Hayton (History) received funds for the purchase of texts and DVDs for his new courses "The History of Medieval Science and Medicine" and "The Scientific Revolution," incorporating an extra-curricular reading group and work with a Student Research Assistant into his plans for seeking out and implementing the materials.

    The Center funded Israel Burshatin (Spanish/Comparative Literature/Gender & Sexuality studies) to purchase primary texts for "Inquiring Minds: Inquisition, Writing, and the Early Modern Subject" course.

    Professor of Classics Bret Mulligan cooked a traditional Roman dinner for his "Introduction to Latin Literature: Catullus and Cicero" course in conjunction with the class's reading a selection of poems by Catullus on dining and symposia.

    Professor of Anthropology Laurie Kain Hart received funds to purchase books for her new course "Psychoanalysis and Anthropology" and for her research which has grown from discussions in the 2001-02 Hurford Humanities Center Faculty Seminar "Black Paris." She is tracing the development of 20th French theory in the related fields of psychoanalysis, anthropology, art and philosophy.

    Professor Hank Glassman of the East Asian Studies Department hosted a workshop for the Japanese Traditional Music Troupe Tokyo Chigakukai for students in the Japanese Language Program, East Asian Studies Department, and Music Department at Haverford.

    The Center funded Deborah Roberts of the Classics Department to bring classicist Betsy Wing to speak on campus.

    Asima F. X. Saad Maura of the Spanish Department hosted a visit from renowned Peruvian/Philadelphia poet Sandro Chiri, editor of the literary journal 'La Casa de Carton' and publisher of several anthologies, critical editions as well as books of his own poetry: El libro del mal amor (1989), Y después de tantas palabras' (1992), Viñetas (2004), Philadelphia Poems (2006).

    Professor Theresa Tensuan of the Department of English and the Gender & Sexuality Studies Program brought musical storytellers and political satirists Charlie King and Karen Brandow to campus to give an afternoon performance and an evening coffee house show of songs, stories, and images from the civil rights movement in conjunction with her course "Arts of the Possible: Literature and Social Justice Movements." Nominated by Pete Seeger for the Sacco-Vanzetti Social Justice Award which he received in 1999, Charlie has been at the heart of American folk music for over 40 years, and his songs have been recorded and sung by performers ranging from Seeger to Arlo Guthrie to Holly Near. Karen Brandow studied voice, performance, and classical guitar while doing human rights work in Guatemala from 1986-1994, and was a founding member of the a cappella singing group, the Non-Traditional Imports. The program was co-sponsored in partnership with the Office of Multicultural Affairs.

    The Center funded Jim Krippner of the History Department to bring internationally renowned print journalist Alma Guillermoprieto to campus for a special lecture "How to be Mexican: How People and Culture Shape Themselves and Each Other Through Song." A frequent contributor both to the New Yorker and to the New York Review of Books, Guillermoprieto has authored four books, including Samba, several anthologies of her journalistic work, and her most recent publication "Dancing with Cuba: A Memoir of the Revolution"; in which she recounts a year spent teaching dance in Cuba in the early days of the revolution. She has received the MacArthur and Neiman Fellowships, and is currently a Radcliffe Institute fellow at Harvard University. Among her numerous accolades, Guillermoprieto received the 1992 Latin American Studies Association Media Award and was elected in 2001 to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

    Professor Laurie Kain Hart (Anthropology) received funds from the Center to bring Mark Auslander, to speak to her "Anthropology of Art" class. Auslander is Director of the Interdisciplinary M.A. Program in Cultural Production and Academic Director of Community Engaged Learning at Brandeis University. He was also 2003-05 Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow in African Arts and Aesthetics & Lecturer in the Departments of Anthropology, Fine Arts, and African & Afro-American Studies at Brandeis. His lecture focused on art and trauma in the context of his research on Sudanese refugees in Kenya.

  • 2005-06

    William Williams, Fine Arts, Photography, received a grant to fund the scanning of some of Haverford's photography collections using the visual resource tool MDIM for his course "History of Photography from 1839-the Present." First use of this technology at Haverford.

  • 2004-05

    Alexander Kitroeff (History), for the History Major Seminar, the identification and preliminary assessment of materials relating to immigration history held by the Historical Society of Philadelphia.

    Kenneth Koltun-Fromm (Religion), for the development of a new course, "Material Religion in America"
    William Williams (Fine Arts), building a digital library of photographs from Haverford's collection for a new course, "History of Photography"

Course Trip Grants

  • 2013-14

    Political Science Professor Craig Borowiak and Mellon Fellow Andy Cornell took students on a tour of the Philadelphia Museum of Art to study the anarchist and activist histories behind the art on display led by Art Historian Allan Antliff.

    Professor of French Kathryn Corbin took students from her "Directions de la France contemporaine" to visit The Barnes Foundation in Philadelphia.

    Professor of English Gus Stadler brought students to "The Stuart Hall Project" documentary at International House, University of Pennsylvania the week before they would be studying Hall.

    Professors of East Asian Studies Paul Smith and Erin Kelley Schoneveld brought students from their "Methods and Approaches in East Asian Studies" classes to see the East Asian collections the Philadelphia Museum of Art.

    History of Art Professor Carol Solomon took students from her course, "Contemporary Art of the Arab World, Iran and Turkey," to New York to attend Iran Modern (Asia Society), Modern Iranian Art: Selections from the Abby Weed Grey Collection (Grey Art Gallery, NYU) and Calligraffiti (Leila Heller Gallery).

    Professors Rosi Song (Spanish, Bryn Mawr College) and Nilgün (Anthropology at Haverford), as teachers of Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Gender and Sexuality, the “core” course for the Bi-Co Program in Gender and Sexuality Studies, took their class to see the film The Hunger Games: Catching Fire.

  • 2012-13

    Both Religion Professor Ken Koltun-Fromm and History Professor Alex Kittroeff took groups of students to visit the National Museum of American Jewish History in Philadelphia.

  • 2011-12

    Professor of German Imke Brust visited the Holocaust Museum in Washington, DC with her "Working through the Holocaust Past in German Drama and Film" class.

    Professor of Spanish and Comparative Literature Israel Burshatin's students in his "The Moor in Spanish Literature" visited the Islamic Art Wing at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, NY.

    English and writing Professor Christian DuComb took his "Twenty-First Century in the Americas" class to a travelling production by The Civilians, "In the Footprint: The Battle over Atlantic Yards," at the Annenberg Center for the Performing Arts, University of Pennsylvania.

    Professor of Classics Danielle La Londe took her students to the University of Pennsylvania's Archaeological Museum to tour Greco-Roman materials.

    Professor of Philosophy Deborah Wright took a group of students to see Lantern Theatre's production of "New Jerusalem, The Interrogation of Baruch de Spinoza at Talmud Torah Congregation: Amsterdam, July 27, 1656" by David Ives.

  • 2010-11

    Associate Professor of Chinese and Linguistics, Shizhe Huang, brought Chinese musician Chin-i Chang to perform for her Advanced Chinese - Music in Chinese Culture class on December 7, 2010.

    Visiting Instructor of Religion Jamel Velji had members of his course "Religion 110: Sacred Texts and Religious Traditions" view an exhibit called "Three Faiths" at the New York Public Library in Spring 2011.

    Professor of History and John R. Coleman Professor of Social Sciences Paul Jakov Smith took his class "The Medieval Transformation of Eurasia, ca. 1000 1400" to see the Medieval European, East Asian, and Middle Eastern exhibitions, along with the special exhibition on "The World of Khubalai Khan" at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City on November 9, 2010.

    Students of Associate Professor of Fine Arts, Markus Baenziger, in his "Sculpture: Materials and Techniques" course and Senior Departmental Studies in Sculpture course went with Visiting Assistant Professor and former Mellon Post - Doctoral Fellow, John Muse and students in his course "Art After Conceptual Art: Theory" to the Dia Beacon for a day-long encounter with canonical works of minimalist sculpture, conceptual art, and installation art on April 2, 2011.

    Associate Professor of English Maud McInerney took students from her course "The Celtic Fringe: Irish, Scots and Welsh Poetry 1747-2009" to see a play called The Pride of Parnell Street at the Act II Playhouse in Ambler, PA.

  • 2009-10

    A freshman writing class saw King Lear with Aryeh Kosman (Philosophy Emeritus); Ulrich Schönherr (German)'s "Music-Text-Performance" class attended a performance of Mozart, The Magic Flute; Darin Hayton (History)'s "Collecting Nature, Displaying Authority" students visited Philadelphia's Mütter Museum of medical anomalies; Carol Solomon (History of Art)'s "Paris in the 19th Century: Art, Visual Culture, and the Psychopathology of the Modern City" course visited the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York; Naomi Koltun-Fromm (Religion)'s "Jerusalem: City, History, and Representation" students saw a performance of Lessing, Nathan the Wise; Linda Gerstein (History)'s "Europe: 1870-1914" students saw Alan Bennett's The Habit of Art; and Paul Smith (Political Science)'s "East Meets West" class visited the Philadelphia Museum of Art.

  • 2008-09

    In 2008-09, students saw Tom Stoppard's Rock 'n Roll with Gus Stadler, English; explored Cezanne and Beyond at the Philadelphia Museum of Art and visited the Barnes Foundation with Carol Solomon (History of Art) and Lisa McCormick (Sociology); toured the historic Laurel Hill Cemetery with Naomi Koltun-Fromm (Religion); and took in an evening of jazz with John Hollenbeck's Large Ensemble with Richard Freedman (Music).

  • 2007-08

    The recipient of a Course Enhancement Grant, Josh Dubler (Religion) took his "Religion in Philadelphia" class to visit Christ Church, the Masonic Lodge, and Eastern State Penitentiary.
    Terrence Johnson (Religion) added supplemental books, field trips, and a speaker visit to his course "Black Religion and Liberation Thought".
    Naomi Koltun-Fromm (Religion) received funding to take her course to the University of Pennsylvania's Museum of Anthropology and Archaeology to see an exhibit on biblical and Near Eastern archaeology.
    Graciela Michelotti (Spanish) and students from her "Evita and her Sisters" course attended the Frida Kahlo exhibit at the Philadelphia Museum of Art

  • 2006-07

    Yukino Goda (East Asian Studies) took Japanese language students to a tour and tea tasting at the Japanese House & Garden in Fairmount Park.
    The Center funded Professor Graciela Michelotti of the Spanish Department to take her Spanish American Theater class to see the famous Latin American play "The Kiss of the Spider Woman" performed by InterAct Theater Company.
    Professor Richard Ball (Economics) took a group of Mathematical Economics students, as well as a multi-disciplinary group of faculty members to see the play "QED" at the Lantern Theater in Philadelphia. The play tells store of Richard Feynman, a physicist who won the Nobel Prize in 1965.
    The Center provided transportation for a group of students organized by Yukino Goda and Yoko Koike in the Japanese Department to attend a special lecture at Swarthmore by Professor Seiichi Makino.
    Professors Kathleen Wright (Philosophy), Ying Li (Fine Arts), and Shizhe Huang (East Asian Studies) took their three courses—"The Logos and the Tao," "Experimental Studio Painting and Drawing," and "Second-year Chinese"—to see the "Mapping the Earth and Mind in Chinese Art" exhibit at the Metropolitan Museum of Art and a "Music of China" performance at the Rubin Museum of Art.
    Professors Suzanne Amador Kane (Physics & Astronomy), Bill DiCanzio (Writing Program), and David Wonnacott brought thirty students from across the academic disciplines to see "Nerds," the musical play about Bill Gates and Steve Jobs.
    Anne McGuire of the Religion Department took her "Images of Jesus" course on a field trip to the Philadelphia Museum of Art; the Center also funded class visits from Ph.D. Candidate in Art History Larry Saporta and Professor Martha Easton (History of Art at Bryn Mawr).

    The Center funded a course innovation grant for Anthropology Professor Maris Gillette's course "Material Culture of China: Chinese Porcelain and Jingdezhen," underwriting a visit to the Philadelphia Museum of Art to look at Chinese domestic and export porcelain, a visit to a potter's studio guided by a professional potter, a visit to the Moravian Pottery and Tile Works established by Henry Mercer in Doylestown, and a visit to Chinatown to look for contemporary Chinese art porcelain and daily ware. The grant also funded class visits from Brian Salzberg, collector of Chinese porcelain and member of the Board of the East Asian Art Department, Philadelphia Museum of Art; and Morgan Perkins, Associate Professor of Anthropology and Art, and Director of the Weaver Museum, SUNY-Potsdam.

  • 2005-06

    Jennifer Patico (Anthropology) and Anne Dalke (English) took their class "Playing with Categories: Redoing the Politics of Sex and Gender" to see the Wilma Theater's production of Doug Wright's "I Am My Own Wife".
    Yukono Goda (East Asian Studies) took Japanese language students to a tour and tea tasting at the Japanese House & Garden in Fairmount Park.
    David Kasunic's Introduction to Opera class attended Rossini's "The Barber of Seville" at the Academy of Music.
    Bret Mulligan (Classics) took students to see a production of Sophocles' "Elektra" at Arcadia University.
    Craig Boroviak (History) sponsored Iron Age Theater's production of Howard Zinn's one-man show "Marx in Soho" at Haverford College.
    Kathleen Wright (Philosophy) took a Philosophy class to view Gunter von Hagens' "Body Worlds" exhibit at the Franklin Institute Science Museum.
    Israel Burshatin (Spanish and Comparative Literature) took his Spanish class to see a Pig Iron's "Poet in New York," a Spanish language performance about poet and dramatist Federico Garcia Lorca. Dito van Reigersberg, who played Lorca, joined the class for dinner after the show.
    David Kasunic (Music) took his Music in the Literary Imagination class to the Philadelphia Museum of Art.
    Richard Freedman (Music) took his Music 223 class to the Philadelphia Chamber Orchestra Concert "Ultimate Mozart 1" at the Kimmel Center.
    For her course "Material Culture of China: Chinese Porcelain and Jingdezhen," Maris Gillette (Anthropology) organized fields trips–to the Philadelphia Museum of Art, a potter's studio, the Moravian Pottery and Tile Works established by Henry Mercer in Doylestown, Chinatown, and the Freer Gallery of Art. Louise Cort from the Smithsonian Institute and other guests also spoke to the class.

Leaves of Grass

  • 2010-11

  • 2009-10

  • 2008-09

    • News Image
      This exhibition showcases Patrick Singleton '82's study of human interaction at various beaches throughout the nation. John B. Hurford '60 Humanities Center Gallery, Stokes Hall Rm. 102. Friday, April 17 - Sunday, May 31, 2009. Opening Reception: Friday, April 17, 2009, 5:30 p.m. - 7:30 p.m.
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      Celebrating African American, Latin American and Native American traditions in concert music. This concert series is sponsored by the Guest Artist Series, the John B. Hurford ’60 Humanities Center, the Distinguished Visitors' Office, and the Native American Fund, in cooperation with the Arboretum Society, the Magill Library Special Collections, and the performance course Music 207: Topics in Piano.
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      In the early eighteenth century, voluntary associations were enshrined at the heart of British public life. The philanthropy and sociability of these organizations underpinned a self-proclaimed “age of benevolence” - how may we account for this moral valorization of civil society in Britain? Presented by The Library, Hurford Humanities Center, and the Office of Alumni Relations.
    • News Image
      A fresh perspective on Benjamin Franklin, who died as president of the abolitionist society without ever freeing one of his own slaves. Sponsored by the Center for Peace and Global Citizenship, the Hurford Humanities Center, the Office of Multicultural Affairs, the Office of Quaker Affairs, and the Women’s Center.
    • News Image
      The John B. Hurford '60 Humanities Center presents “An Evening with Madame F”, a musical drama by Claudia Stevens, visiting scholar/artist at the College of William and Mary. The performance will take place November 9, at 3 p.m. in Marshall Auditorium of Roberts Hall.
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      Los Angeles artist Pato Hebert explores art and social justice in a public talk and semester-long residency. He will also give a talk and present an installation on Friday, December 5th in Stokes 102.
    • News Image
      The John B. Hurford '60 Humanities Center presents a photography exhibit about HIV/AIDS in Uganda. The exhibit brings together the work of photographers Meredith Montague BMC '03 and Jenna Mulhall Brereton BMC '96.
    • News Image
      The Hurford Humanities Center is pleased to sponsor two workshops this fall on documentary film-making techniques, to be conducted by award-winning documentarian Louis Massiah.
  • 2007-08

    • News Image
      The fascinating music and artistic philosophy of composer John Cage came to life at Christopher Shultis' performance at the Cantor Fitzgerald Gallery. Includes video.
    • News Image
      Sligh's thought-provoking work challenges assumptions and generates discussion about race, sexuality, and gender identities.
    • News Image
      Mr. Nalasinham was our composer-in-residence from 9/24/07—10/7/2007. In addition to being a composer, he is an accomplished violinist both in the Karnatic (South Indian classical) and Western classical traditions, and the founder and first violinist of the Madras String Quartet. During his residency, he offered workshops and gave two performances.
      Learn more >
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      Padmashri Darshana Jhaveri - Classical Manipuri Dances of India
      A classical Manipuri dancer, research scholar, and teacher, Padmashri is one of the four internationally renowned Jhaveri Sisters, whose names have become synonymous with Manipuri Dance. As part of their national tour, the troupe held a four-day residency on campus that included a free performance; a lecture; a lecture and demonstration on "Classical Elements of Manipuri Dance" and on "The Role of Rhythm in Manipuri Dance and Drumming."

    "Foreigner," a one-woman play written and performed by Anisa George, depicted how faith, identity and culture clash, as she reenacted her upbringing and solo journey to Islamic Iran in search of her Bah‡'i roots.

    Poet Roger Nonair-Agard came to campus in conjunction with the College's Women's Center for a reading of his work as part of Black History Month.

  • 2006-07

    "The Flying Words Project"
    The Humanities Center funded the bringing Deaf poets "The Flying Words Project" to Haverford as the closing event for the College's "Representing Disability: Theory, Policy, Practice" conference.

    Japanese Music Series
    February 3 - A hands-on Taiko (big drum) Workshop with Stuart Paton Sensei of the Burlington Taiko Group from Vermont.
    February 15 - James Nyoraku Schlefer and Ensemble East.

    "Tales of a Few Cities," Drawings and Sketchbooks by Barry Nemett at Haverford College.
    The exhibit consisted primarily of large-scale, multi-paneled drawings derived from places where the artist has lived – in the U.S., France, and Italy. Although the images are a result of direct observation, many of these drawings bring together locations from each of the countries to form a unified, seemingly realistic, yet altogether invented landscape. Also including some of his sketchbooks in the exhibit, Nemett served as artist-in-residence with the Haverford Fine Arts Department on September 18th and 19th and November 28th and 29th. The residency included several artist talks, a Philadelphia art tour, and a landscape workshop and advanced critique session with Fine Arts students.

    Events:
    September 18, opening reception
    September 19, talk: Barry Nemett's work in relation to literature, poetry, and film
    November 29, talk: "Storytelling Without Words: How Paintings Speak"

  • 2005-06

    The Humanities Center funded the bringing of playwright, actress, and performance artist Sarah Jones to Haverford to stage a preview of her Tony Award-winning performance in "Bridge and Tunnel" (opened in January 2006) as the kick off event for a three-day Unity Fest. Her performance was followed by a question and answer session and dinner with students and members of the Unity Fest Committee in the Dining Center.

    Japanese Music series:
    A hands-on Taiko (big drum) Workshop with Stuart Paton Sensei of the Burlington Taiko Group from Vermont, Marshall Auditorium, Roberts Hall.

    James Nyoraku Schlefer and Ensemble East, performed a mix of traditional and contemporary pieces for shakuhachi (bamboo flute), shamisen (Japanese banjo) and koto (Japanese zither) in MacCrate Recital Hall, Union. Called "A Master of the Shakuhachi" by The New York Times, James Nyoraku Schlefer is a leading performer and teacher of shakuhachi in New York City.

  • 2004-05

    Flying Words Project
    A collaborative performance using mime, body and sign language, and voice, featuring Peter Cook, a poet and storyteller who is deaf and signs, and Kenny Lerner, a professor at the Rochester Institute of Technology, who is Peter Cook's hearing voice. The performance was in conjunction with a Tri-Co conference, "Signs and Voices: Language, Arts, and Identity from Deaf to Hearing," Faculty Sponsor: Kristin Lindgren, Visiting Lecturer in the Writing Program

    Four Horizons Quartet
    An afternoon of chamber music featuring Olivier Messiaen's "Quartet for the End of Time," Ingrid Arauco's "Fantasy-Quartet," and Erwin Schulhoff's "Duo for Violin and Cello, Marshall Auditorium, performed by Charles Abramovic (piano), Allison Herz (clarinet), Karen Bentley Pollock (violin), and Michal Schmidt (cello). The program featured a pre-concert talk by Jerry Levinson, who is Professor of Music at Swarthmore College and a leading American pupil of Messiaen's, about "Quartet for the End of Time." The piece was composed during the winter of 1940-41, when the composer was a prisoner of war at Gorlitz in Poland. The work was written for performance by the composer and three fellow musician inmates and its premier took place in the camp. Faculty Sponsor: Richard Freedman, Professor of Music

    Printmaker in Residence Series
    Faculty Sponsor: Hee Sook Kim, Assistant Professor of Fine Arts

    October 4-9, Kelly Reemtsen, California based print maker
    October 5, 4:30 p.m., Artist Talk, Chase Auditorium: "Lifestyle in the 50s, 60s and 70s"
    November 16-21, Gloria Escobar, Columbia-born print maker
    November 17, 1:30 p.m., Book Binding Demonstration, Arnecliffe Studio and at 4:30 p.m., Artist Talk, Chase Auditorium: "From the Parts to the Whole"
    February 21-26, Jackie Battenfield, artist, curator, arts administrator, teacher
    February 22, 4:30 p.m., Artist Talk, Sharpless Auditorium: "Day Burn," about the artist's prints and paintings, and their interactive relationships
    March 28-April 2, Lisa Makie, New York based printmaker and painter
    March 30, 1:15 p.m., Xerox Printmaking Demonstration, Arnecliffe Studio
    March 29, 4:30 p.m., Artist Talk, Chase Auditorium: "From Book to Installation"

Symposia / Forums / Speakers

  • 2010-11

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      Sunday, May 1st & Monday, May 2nd: Bringing together scholars in fields ranging from literature, philosophy, sociology, theology, and cultural studies, the Hurford Humanities Center symposium Modern Jewish Thought and Culture challenges long-standing theoretical divisions in contemporary Jewish practice.
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      Tues. April 19th, 7:00 p.m., Stokes Auditorium: Screening: Wild Combination: a Portrait of Arthur Russell (2008). Wed. April 20th, 4:30 p.m., Sharpless Auditorium: Closet Heterosexuality: The Queer and the Deleuzian in the Work of Arthur Russell.
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      March 18-19, 2011: Convened by Ruti Talmor in connection with the exhibition Possible Cities, the 2011 Mellon Symposium Imaging Africa brings together leading curators, filmmakers, critics, and scholars to discuss the status of African visual culture in the contemporary moment.
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      Wednesday, March 23-two events: 12-2 p.m. CPGC Café (lunch provided): Roundtable on Collecting Oral Histories of Human Rights Crises. 4:30-6p.m. Chase Auditorium: Readings from recent Voice of Witness books on Zimbabwe and Burma.
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      February 9, 7:00PM, Stokes Multicultural Center: This panel discussion, moderated by senior editor, Nathan Schneider, will be framed around the idea of "killing the Buddha." The panelists will include Haverford community members, each of whom will be asked to think about specific Buddhas (or “-isms”) that need to be killed today, and through that frame, to speak to the interwoven relationships between religion and suspicion in America today.
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      Thursday, February 10th at 7:00 p.m., Sharpless Auditorium: Public talk by the Perpetual Peace Project organizers Aaron Levy, Martin Rauchbauer, and Gregg Lambert. Workshops, Friday, February 11th. Apply to participate.
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      Monday, Jan. 17, 2011 - Sharpless Auditorium: Join us as Dr. Lucius Outlaw, Jr. discusses Dr. King’s relevance today. Are we truly in a post-racial society? How do issues of race, diversity, multiculturalism, and civil rights play out in our nation with our new President Obama? What about on Haverford’s campus?
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      Saturday, November 6, 2010 - Stokes Auditorium: This major international, interdisciplinary conference aims to examine the history, literature, and culture of the Quaker relationship with slavery, from the society’s origins in the English Civil War to the end of the American Civil War.
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      Wednesday, October 20th, 4:30pm - Stokes 102 Talk by Tom Conley, Abbot Lawrence Lowell Professor of Visual and Environmental Studies and of Romance Languages and Literatures, Harvard University. An Errant Eye studies how topography, the art of describing local space and place, developed literary and visual form in early modern France.
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      Fri., Oct. 15 - Sat., Oct 16, 2010: International scholars and practitioners gather for the first ever symposium devoted to Paul Strand’s historic work in Mexico. Organized in conjunction with the publication of Paul Strand in Mexico by James Krippner, Haverford College Professor of History, and a companion exhibit at Aperture.
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      Organized by students at Haverford & Bryn Mawr Colleges, Re: Humanities is a two-day symposium featuring presentations by undergraduate scholars interested in the effects of digital media on academia. We seek student researchers who are excited about the field, interested in developing and presenting projects of their own, and willing to encourage enthusiasm at their home campuses. Submission Deadline: Oct 7, 2010.
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  • 2009-10

  • 2008-09

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      June 15-17: A three-day series of conversations, workshops, and performances exploring the intersection of music and quantum mechanics. Organized by Professors Joshua Schrier (Chemistry) and Stephon Alexander (Physics). Supported by a Mellon Arts Residency Planning Grant.
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      Wed. May 6, 6-9 p.m.: Forty-seven students from Professor of Religion Ken Koltun-Fromm's Material Religion in America class will offer multimedia presentations of their final projects in the Bryn Mawr Room of the Dining Center. A buffet dinner will be served for all those who attend. Thur. May 7, from 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.: Three Haverford professors and three distinguished visitors will participate in an all-day conference in Sharpless Auditorium. Topics will include
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      A roundtable discussion on the future of the humanities in an age of digital archivalism. Speakers include Laura Mandell, U. Miami- Ohio, Caroline Levander, Rice University, and Jeffrey Schnapp, Stanford University. Supported, in part, with a grant for Symposium Speakers.
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      A series of screenings and conversations with world-renowned documentary filmmakers organized by Haverford's visiting filmmaker Vicky Funari. Supported as short-term arts residencies and screenings by the Hurford Humanities Center and Distinguished Visitors Fund.
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      Sponsored by the Center for Peace & Global Citizenship, the Hurford Humanities Center, the Distinguished Visitors Program, and the Department of Fine Arts.
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      Glaydah Namukasa is an emerging fiction writer with one novel (The Deadly Ambition, 2006), a young adult novel (The Voice of a Dream, 2006), and several short stories to her credit. Learn about her visit and view photos of the event. Supported as a short-term arts residency and reading.
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      The Hurford Humanities Center presents Photo Movements, an exhibition of work by Visiting Artist-in-Residence Pato Hebert. December 5 – 14, 2008 & January 20 - March 1, 2009.
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      On Monday, October 20th, Peter Hutton will screen his film "At Sea" (2007) in Chase Auditorium, followed by a public conversation with Professor of Anthropology Jesse Weaver Shipley.
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      Los Angeles artist Pato Hebert explores art and social justice in a public talk and semester-long residency. He will also give a talk and present an installation on Friday, December 5th in Stokes 102.
  • 2007-08

    HHC hosted several symposia and lectures this year in connection with major exhibitions: "From Slavery to Freedom: The Formation of African-American and American Identity" addressed themes of historical struggle and emancipation arising from a trio of exhibitions.

    Professor Israel Burshatin (Spanish/Comparative Literature) convened a colloquium focusing on "Jake in Transition," a photo essay by Philadelphia-based, internationally-acclaimed photographer Clarissa Sligh that chronicles a female-to-male transition.  Held against the backdrop of three thought-provoking Sligh exhibitions on campus, the roundtable discussion explored the role of photography in the construction of genders; the affinities and differences between racial and sexual passing; and the convergence of performance, image, and narrative in the fashioning of gendered and racialized bodies.

    "Shakespeare and the Blending Mind"–the annual Mellon Fellows Symposium, led this year by Michael Booth–gathered cognitive scientists, philosophers of language, Shakespeare scholars, and theater practitioners to explore the mutually illuminating relationship between Shakespearean poetics and contemporary theories of mind.

    Other forums supported by HHC included "Outsourcing Philosophy," a colloquium considering philosophical labor performed outside the field's traditional disciplinary boundaries, organized by Philosophy Professor Jerry Miller in partnership with the Greater Philadelphia Philosophy Consortium; "Legacies of Civil War & Revolution, Greece, Guatemala, Turkey," a conference arranged by Anita Isaacs (Political Science) and Alex Kitroeff (History) to confront histories of violence, memory, and (in)justice through comparative cultural analysis; and  "AcadeMIX Live!," a panel on international hip-hop that brought together for the first time in an academic setting hip-hop practitioners in a global perspective.  Led by Maria McMath (Anthropology, Peace and Conflict Studies) and a group of dedicated students, "AcadeMIX Live!" also featured master classes on deejaying and beatboxing, accompanied by a performance from contemporary bhangra pioneer DJ Rekha (NYU) and other artists.

  • 2006-07
    Tri-Co Senior Religion Colloquium
    Guest speaker Amy Hollywood sponsored by Humanities Center
    "Celebrating Philosophy in the Liberal Arts: a Symposium in Honor of Aryeh Kosman"

    Professor Aryeh Kosman joined Haverford's faculty in 1962.  Since then he has instructed some 700 philosophy majors and thousands of other students interested in ancient philosophy, a subject about which he has written extensively.  The symposium, held in honor of the retiring Professor, featured Michael Bratman '67 (Stanford University), Felmon Davis '70 (Union College), and Martha Woodruff '86 (Middlebury College), all graduates of Haverford College, presenting thoughts on the role of philosophy in liberal arts education during the morning session (moderated by Jim Friedman '67).

    In the afternoon, John Cooper (Princeton University),  Jim Lennox (University of Pittsburgh), and Charlotte Witt (University of New Hampshire) presented papers on the topic of ancient philosophy, moderated by Professor Steve Salkever (Bryn Mawr).

    "Homer in Translation"

    A symposium on approaches to translating Homer and to Homer in translation, on the 150th anniversary of the publication of F.W. Newman's version of the Iliad, one of the main objects of criticism in Matthew Arnold's influential "On Translating Homer."

    Talks included: "Horsing around with Homer: The Literary Dynamic of (Re)translation in the Latin and English Traditions," Richard Armstrong, University of Houston; "Sounding Out Homer: Christopher Logue's Acoustic Homer," Emily Greenwood, University of St. Andrews; and "From Miniature to Monsterist: Cross-Genre Translations of Homer,"Lorna Hardwick, The Open University.  The symposium also featured a roundtable discussion on teaching  and learning Homer in translation, as well as   readings from the Iliad and Odyssey by Stanley Lombardo, professor of Classics at the University of Kansas known for his translations of the Iliad, the Odyssey, and the Aeneid.  On the Thursday preceding the symposium, faculty and students presented an all-day reading of Homer's Odyssey starting at 8:30 a.m. in the Sunken Lounge, Haverford Dining Center. This event lasted over twelve hours!

  • 2005-06
    Alumni Residencies

    The Center hosted two alumni visits. For Professor Maud McInerney's English course on the epic, Professor Brian Rose '78 (Archaeology, University of Pennsylvania) gave a lecture entitled "Assessing the Evidence for the Trojan War: Recent Archaeological Discoveries." He then went to dinner with faculty and students.

    John Morse '73, President and Publisher of Merriam-Webster Incorporated, met with Haverford Journal leaders and other interested students over dinner and had a roundtable discussion about the world of nonfiction publishing.

    Films

    The Center presented three documentary film screenings in 2005-06 and brought the filmmakers to campus for talks, class sessions, and other gatherings.

    Indian filmmaker Priti Chandriani screened and discussed her film "Rani Hindustani" (Indian Queen), a 24-minute short film about a woman who rebelled against many social traditions. The screening was in conjunction with the Student Seminar, "I Love My Culture, but Where is My Feminism?"

    Documentary Filmmaker Albert Maysles visited to screen his landmark non-fiction feature film "Salesman" (1968), a portrait of four door-to-door Bible salesmen from Boston. Albert Maysles' other films include "Gimme Shelter" (1970) and "Grey Gardens" (1976). This screening was scheduled in conjunction with the "Material Religion" Symposium and was organized by filmmaker and consultant Julia D'Amico.

    Internationally renowned filmmaker and author Robert Gardner visited to screen his film "Forest of Bliss" (1985), a cinematic essay on the ancient city of Benares, India. Gardner's other films include "Dead Birds" (1964) and "Rivers of Sand" (1974).  Robert Gardner was the Director of the Film Study Center at Harvard University (1957-1997) and is also an author. This screening was coordinated with the Anthropology Department and was organized by filmmaker and consultant Julia D'Amico.  Documentary filmmaker visits were sponsored by the Leaves of Grass Fund.

    Lecture Series in conjunction with the McGill Library Exhibit, "Franklin & Friends"

    David Seaman, Director of the Digital Library Federation
    David Fox, Director of the University of Pennsylvania Reading Project
    David Waldstreicher, Temple University Professor and Historian

    Material Religion in America Symposium

    May 3 and 4 - presented by Religion Professor Ken Koltun-Fromm as culmination of a new class, "Material Religion in America," featured evening student poster sessions with symposium speakers and Tri-Co students and faculty, and a day-long  symposium.

    Speakers:
    Ken Koltun-Fromm, Haverford Religion Department
    Stephen Marini, Professor of American Religion and Ethics, Wellesley College,
    John Lardas, Haverford Religion Department
    Colleen McDannell, Department of History, University of Utah
    Darin Hayton, Haverford History Department
    Alex Kitroeff, Haverford History Department
    Tim Chandler, College of Fine and Professional Arts, Kent State University

    Albert Maysles' screening of "Salesman" and the "Picturing Faith" Exhibit were presented in conjunction with this symposium.

  • 2004-05
    Public Forums

    Film Series: The Wild World of Cinema, Thursdays at 8 p.m., Chase 105
    Faculty Sponsor: David Sedley, Associate Professor of French
    Films selected by faculty to represent serious and important work in World Cinema

    January 27: "Fist of Fury," introduced by Paul Smith (History)
    About the film: Directed by Wei Hoi, Hong Kong, 1972.
    A 1970s kung fu classic with revenge, mystery, melodrama, and martial arts

    February 10: "The Seedling," introduced by Rajeswari Mohan (English)
    About the film: Directed by Shyam, Benegal, India, 1973.
    A landmark film about illicit love in the caste system featuring Shabama Azmi, who "burst onto the Indian film scene with her smoldering performance"

    February 24: "Alexander Nevsky," introduced by Linda Gerstein (History)
    About the film: Directed by Sergei Eisenstein, Soviet Union, 1938.
    A masterpiece of Stalinist propaganda, with a score by Sergei Prokovief, with battle-scene violence that has inspired generations of film artists from Laurence Olivier to Steven Speilberg

    March 24: "The Spook Who Sat by the Door," introduced by Jerry Miller
    (Philosophy)
    About the film: Directed by Ivan Dixon, USA, 1973.
    An explosive cult classic about a new American Revolution triggered by a "token black" CIA operative in order to establish a separatist black nation

    April 7: "Amacord," introduced by Bruce Partridge (Physics)
    About the film: Directed by Federico Fellini, Italy, 1974
    A surrealist satire of the 1903s Italy of Fellin's youth. A carnival of fascist politics, mental illness, bodily function, and a
    diminutive nun

    April 21: "The American Astronaut," introduced by John Lardas (Religion)
    About the film: Directed by Cory McAbee, USA, 2001
    A spaghetti western musical set in outer space that is also the sequel to Fritz Lang's classic film "Metropolis"

    2004-05 Seminar Speakers

    November 11, 4:30 p.m.
    The Rt. Rev. Charles E. Bennison, Jr., Bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Pennsylvania: "Theological Considerations of the Blessing of Same-Sex Unions," for "Topography of the Family: On Ideology, Science, Religion, and the Politics of Conjugal, Filial and Gendered Life" Student Seminar

    March 21, 4:30 p.m.
    John Hollander, Sterling Professor of English (Emeritus) at Yale University, for "What are Poets and Polynomials For?" Student Seminar